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Addiction, Dipsomania & Methomania

 

Addiction, Dipsomania & Methomania to Spirituality

Lian had been meditating for many years before consulting with me for his depression. He had been part of a spiritual community that encouraged their members to turn to God through prayer and meditation whenever they were feeling any difficult or painful feelings such as anger, hurt, anxiety, or depression. He had been taught that Spirit would transmute his feelings for him and bring him the peace he sought.

spirituality

Lian had been meditating for many years before consulting with me for his depression. He had been part of a spiritual community that encouraged their members to turn to God through prayer and meditation whenever they were feeling any difficult or painful feelings such as anger, hurt, anxiety, or depression. He had been taught that Spirit would transmute his feelings for him and bring him the peace he sought.

Yet Lian was depressed. “I have faithfully practiced what I’ve had been taught, so why am I still depressed? What am I doing wrong?”

Lian was suffering from what is called “spiritual bypass.”

Spiritual bypass occurs when people use their spiritual practice as a way to avoid dealing with and taking responsibility for their feelings. Anything that is used to avoid feeling and taking responsibility for feelings becomes an Addiction, Dipsomania & Methomania – whether it is alcohol, drugs, food, TV, work, gambling, spending, shopping, anger, withdrawal…and meditation. If, when a difficult or painful feeling comes up, you immediately go into meditation in the hopes of blissing out and getting rid of the feeling, you may be addicted to spirituality.

It all depends on what your intent is when you are meditating. People can meditate for two totally different reasons: to avoid pain or to learn about love.

If you are meditating to connect with yourself and your spiritual Guidance in order to learn more about loving yourself and others, then meditation is a good way to get out of your head and into your heart. It is a good way to connect with a loving part of yourself so that you can welcome and embrace your painful feelings and learn what you may be doing or thinking that is causing your own pain. When your intent is to be loving to yourself and take responsibility for your own feelings, then meditation can help you become centered and compassionate enough to do an inner exploration with your feeling self.

However, if you are using meditation to bliss out and avoid your pain, you are using your spirituality addictively. You are using your spirituality to bypass learning about and taking responsibility for your feelings.

This is what Lian was doing. Because he was avoiding learning from his feelings, he was continuing to think and behave in ways toward himself and others that caused him to feel depressed. Then, instead of exploring what he was doing that was causing his feeling self, his inner child, to feel depressed, he was meditating to try to get rid of the feelings.

In his work with me, Lian discovered that he was constantly either ignoring his inner child – his feeling self – or he was in self-judgment. The combination of ignoring himself – which he did primarily through meditation – and judging himself resulted in his inner child feeling unloved, unimportant, and unseen. Lian saw that if he treated his actual children in the way he treated himself – ignoring their feelings and constantly judging them – they would also feel badly and maybe depressed. But Lian did attend to his actual children’s feelings and needs. It was his own that he was ignoring and judging.

Lian realized that he was treating himself the way his parents had treated him. He was a much better parent to his children than his parents had been with him, but he was parenting his own inner child in the way he had been parented. He was not only treating himself the way he had been treated, he was treating himself the way his parents had treated themselves. As a result, he was not being a good role model for his children of personal responsibility for his own feelings, just as his parents had been a poor role model for him.

In the course of working with me, Lian learned the Inner Bonding process that we teach. He learned to welcome his painful feelings during meditation. He learned to quiet the self-judgmental part of himself and to treat himself with caring and respect. He learned to take loving action in his own behalf so that his inner child no longer felt abandoned by him. It was the inner abandonment that was causing his depression. He discovered that his depression was actually a gift – a way his inner child was letting him know that he was not being loving to himself. With practice, Lian learned to take loving care of himself and his depression disappeared. Now his meditation practice was no longer a spiritual bypass.

 

Christian Religious Addiction, Dipsomania & Methomania in Hawaii?

Surveys show that religion and spirituality play a central role in the lives of most of the population in human experience. Gallup (1989) found that 53% of the U.S. population considers religion to be very important in their life, and another 31% considered it fairly important (p. 176). The religious and spiritual dimensions of culture were found to be among the most important factors that structure human experience, beliefs, values, behavior, and illness (Browning et al., 1990; James, 1961; Krippner and Welch, 1992).

Researchers however, report that some individuals have problems that concern their religion. Members of the American Psychological Association reported that at least one in six of their clients presented issues that involve religion or spirituality (Shafranske and Maloney, 1990). In another study, 29% of psychologists agreed that religious issues are important in the treatment of all or many of their clients (Bergin and Jensen, 1990, p. 3). Psychotherapy can sometimes be effective in treating religious problems. Robinson (1986) noted, "Some patients have troublesome conflicts about religion that could probably be resolved through the process of psychotherapy" (p.22).

Poly-behavioral Addiction, Dipsomania & Methomania, Sex Addiction, Dipsomania & Methomania, Gambling, Food Addiction, Dipsomania & Methomania, Religious Addiction, Dipsomania & Methomania, Alcoholism, Drug Addiction, Dipsomania & Methomania, Internet Addiction, Dipsomania & Methomania

Surveys show that religion and spirituality play a central role in the lives of most of the population in human experience. Gallup (1989) found that 53% of the U.S. population considers religion to be very important in their life, and another 31% considered it fairly important (p. 176). The religious and spiritual dimensions of culture were found to be among the most important factors that structure human experience, beliefs, values, behavior, and illness (Browning et al., 1990; James, 1961; Krippner and Welch, 1992).

Researchers however, report that some individuals have problems that concern their religion. Members of the American Psychological Association reported that at least one in six of their clients presented issues that involve religion or spirituality (Shafranske and Maloney, 1990). In another study, 29% of psychologists agreed that religious issues are important in the treatment of all or many of their clients (Bergin and Jensen, 1990, p. 3). Psychotherapy can sometimes be effective in treating religious problems. Robinson (1986) noted, "Some patients have troublesome conflicts about religion that could probably be resolved through the process of psychotherapy" (p.22).

Religious problems can be as various and complex as mental health problems. One type of psychoreligious problem involves patients who intensify their adherence to religious practices and orthodoxy (Lukoff, Lu, and Turner 1992, p. 677). Generally when people speak of addictive diseases they imply a medical problem. In the past few years the term Addiction, Dipsomania & Methomania has been used to characterize behaviors that go beyond chemicals. Dr. Robert Lefever (1988) views Addiction, Dipsomania & Methomania as a "family disease" involving self-denial and caretaking, domination, and submission (p. ix). Gerald May (1988) states that Addiction, Dipsomania & Methomania is a "state of compulsion, obsession, or preoccupation that enslaves a person's will and desire" (p.14). Shaef (1987) defines Addiction, Dipsomania & Methomania as "any process over which we are powerless" (p. 18). She divides Addiction, Dipsomania & Methomanias into two categories: substance Addiction, Dipsomania & Methomanias -alcohol, drugs, nicotine, food) and process Addiction, Dipsomania & Methomanias -money-accumulation, gambling, sex, work, worry, and religion.

Research in the area of religious Addiction, Dipsomania & Methomania is deficient, however there were a few older related studies found in the literature. Simmonds (1977) reports that there is some evidence to indicate that "religious people in general tend to exhibit dependency on some external source of gratification" (p. 114). Black and London (1966) found a high positive correlation between the variables of obedience to parents and country and indices of religious belief such as church attendance, belief in God and prayer (p. 39). Goldsen, et al. (1960) showed that people who were more religious consistently showed tendencies toward greater social conformity than did the nonreligious, a finding consistent with the notion that religious people seek external approval. These results are supported by Fisher (1964 p. 784), who reported that a measure of social approval and religion were strongly associated. Religious people show dependence not only on social values, but also on other external agents. Duke (1964, p. 227) found that church attendance indicated more responsiveness to the effects of a placebo. In a study of 50 alcoholics, it was found that those who were dependent on alcohol were more likely to have had a religious background (Walters, 1957, p. 405).

The few research studies aforementioned seem to suggest that religious people develop a dependency on religious practices for social approval. Since religious people seem to be describable in terms of relatively high levels of dependence, it seems useful to borrow a concept suggested by Peele and Brodsky (1975)- that of "Addiction, Dipsomania & Methomania." According to these writers Addiction, Dipsomania & Methomania is "a person's attachment to a sensation, an object, or another person... such as to lessen his appreciation of and ability to deal with other things in his environment, or in himself, so that he has become increasingly dependent on that experience as his only source of gratification" (p. 168).

There are a variety of definitions for the concept of religious Addiction, Dipsomania & Methomania. Arterburn and Felton (1992) state that "when a person is excessively devoted to something or surrenders compulsively and habitually to something, that pathological and physiological dependency on a substance, relationship, or behavior results in Addiction, Dipsomania & Methomania" (p. 104). They indicate that, "like any other Addiction, Dipsomania & Methomania, the practice of religion becomes central to every other aspect of life...all relationships evolve from the religion, and the dependency on the religious practice and its members removes the need for a dependency on God...the religion and those who practice it then become the central power for the addict who no longer is in touch with God" (p. 117).

Spirituality can also have pathological aspects to it. Vaughan (1991) reports that "the shadow side to a healthy search for wholeness can be called Addiction, Dipsomania & Methomania to spirituality" (p. 105). He indicates that this can be found among people who use spirituality as a solution to problems they are unwilling to face. Van-Kaam (1987) presents a viewpoint of Addiction, Dipsomania & Methomania as a quasi religious or falsified religious presence. He reports that "an understanding of the relationship between religious presence and Addiction, Dipsomania & Methomania allows potential dangers of receptivity to be identified in order to realize the real value of true religious presence and the shame of its counterfeit, Addiction, Dipsomania & Methomania" (p. 243). McKenzie (1991) discusses Addiction, Dipsomania & Methomania as an unauthentic form of spiritual existence. He says that, "Addiction, Dipsomania & Methomania is born of the human desire for transcendence which is often perverted or misplaced by societies that encourage their members to seek ultimate meaning in dimensions that have no regard for the transcendent" (p. 325). Heise (1991, p. 11) explores the fundamentalist Christian's focus on perfectionism, and it's possible contribution to an increase in dysfunctional individuals, family systems, and Addiction, Dipsomania & Methomanias.

Until recently, research in this area has primarily focused on religious cults. Estimates of the number of cults range from several hundred to several thousand, with a total membership up to three million (Allen and Metoyer, 1988, p. 38; Melton, 1986). According to Margaret Singer, Ph.D., a psychologist specializing in cult phenomena, "the word cult describes a power structure,...what really sets a cult apart is that one person has proclaimed himself to have some special knowledge, and if he can convince others to let him be in charge, he will share that knowledge" (Collins & Frantz, 1994, p. 30). The Jim Jones People's Temple mass suicide has been documented in the news, and more recently David Koresh's Branch Davidian Christian cult. Cults, both destructive and benign, have been with us in various guises since time immemorial. Many psychologists and psychiatrists have become knowledgeable about destructive cults in the course of their work with patients affected by the problem.

Within the past few years, however, traditional Church members have faced their compulsive behavior and harmful beliefs. Doucette (1992) reports that "many people are waking up because they have seen their religious leaders fall. Some researchers believe that the magnitude of the tragedy of religious Addiction, Dipsomania & Methomania and abuse was revealed by the TV evangelist scandals documented in the news media which involved: Jim and Tammy Bakker; Jimmy Swaggart; and Oral Roberts (Brand 1987, p. 82; Woodward 1987, p. 68; and Kaufman 1988, p. 37). These personal confessions have exposed not only how these supposed men of God had betrayed people's trust, but how many of those who had been abused, betrayed, and bankrupted never seemed to question what was happening and continued to support these individuals.

Booth (1991) states that "the Bakker, Swaggart, and Roberts scandals created a national intervention that served to interrupt the progress of this unhealthy phenomenon" (p. 38). What had previously been viewed as fanaticism or zealotry increasingly began to be called religious Addiction, Dipsomania & Methomania and religious abuse. Booth (1991) defines religious Addiction, Dipsomania & Methomania as"using God, a church, or a belief system as an escape from reality, or as a weapon against ourselves or others in an attempt to find or elevate a sense of self-worth or well-being" (p. 38).

Other researchers use the terms spiritual and psychological abuse to describe the characteristics of religious Addiction, Dipsomania & Methomania. Enroth (1992) says that his book "Churches That Abuse is about people who have been abused psychologically and spiritually in churches and other Christian organizations" (p. 29). He reports that "unlike physical abuse that often results in bruised bodies, spiritual and pastoral abuse leaves scars on the psyche and soul...the perversion of power that we see in abusive churches disrupts and divides families, fosters unhealthy dependence of members on the leadership, and creates, ultimately, spiritual confusion in the lives of victims" (p. 29). The scandals involving TV evangelists created a national intervention by bringing religious Addiction, Dipsomania & Methomania and abuse too close to home to be ignored. Those scandals spurred people to act and call for change.

During this period, I had the unique opportunity to conduct a literature review and survey on the relatively newly recognized phenomenon of religious Addiction, Dipsomania & Methomania within Christianity in the State of Hawaii for my dissertation while pursuing my doctor of psychology degree (Psy.D) in clinical psychology. After studying the symptoms, beliefs, and stages of religious Addiction, Dipsomania & Methomania along with the characteristics of religiously addictive organizations, I came to believe that having an intense faith or religious ferver is not equal to having a religious Addiction, Dipsomania & Methomania. Most people experience healthy religion and a spiritual life in which obedience to God is balanced with a freedom to serve others in ways of individual experession.

I also discovered however, that church leaders in Hawaii that were self-appointed (not elected/ appointed by their church) significantly identified more with religious addictive beliefs, symptoms and practices compared to their counterparts.

For more info see: Hawaii and Christian Religious Addiction, Dipsomania & Methomania
http://www.universal-publishers.com/book.php?method=ISBN&book=1581122101

Addiction, Dipsomania & Methomanias Recovery Management Services
http://www.geocities.com/drslbdzn/Behavioral_Addiction, Dipsomania & Methomanias.html

James Slobodzien, Psy.D., CSAC, is a Hawaii licensed psychologist and certified substance abuse counselor who earned his doctorate in Clinical Psychology. He is credentialed by the National Registry of Health Service Providers in Psychology. He has over 20-years of mental health experience primarily working in the fields of alcohol/ substance abuse and behavioral Addiction, Dipsomania & Methomanias in hospital, prison, and court settings. He is an adjunct professor of Psychology and also maintains a private practice as a mental health consultant.

 

 

Addiction, Dipsomania & Methomania; Desperate Maladies Require Desperate Remedies

An Addiction, Dipsomania & Methomania is an uncontrollable strong craving for something, or to be abnormally dependent on something that is psychologically or physically habit-forming. There are many types of Addiction, Dipsomania & Methomania, the most common are alcohol Addiction, Dipsomania & Methomania, narcotic Addiction, Dipsomania & Methomania, and drug Addiction, Dipsomania & Methomania; also known as substance dependence.

Addiction, Dipsomania & Methomania, drug Addiction, Dipsomania & Methomania, drugs, Addiction, Dipsomania & Methomania recovery, Addiction, Dipsomania & Methomania treatment, therapy, drug Addiction, Dipsomania & Methomania treatment, drug rehab

An Addiction, Dipsomania & Methomania is an uncontrollable strong craving for something, or to be abnormally dependent on something that is psychologically or physically habit-forming. There are many types of Addiction, Dipsomania & Methomania, the most common are alcohol Addiction, Dipsomania & Methomania, narcotic Addiction, Dipsomania & Methomania, and drug Addiction, Dipsomania & Methomania; also known as substance dependence.

Drug Addiction, Dipsomania & Methomania is the compulsive use of drugs, to the extreme point where the user has no other choice but to continue to use them. A drug addict might address his beloved drug in De Quincey’s words, “thou hast the keys of Paradise, oh, just, subtle, and mighty opium!” An addict’s paradise is an inferno in disguise.

The demon of drug abuse has engulfed the entire world. It has clutched the youth of society in its deadly jaws.

The range of addictive drugs or substances and widely abused drugs include Alcohol, Anabolic steroids, Analgetics, Barbiturates, Buprenorphine, Butorphanol, Chloral hydrate, trichloroethanol & derivatives, Cocaine, Codeine, Dextroproxyp, Dextromethorphan, Ethchlorvynol, Fentanyl & its analogs, Gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB), Glutethimide, Heroin (Diacetylmorphine), Hydrocodone, Hydromorphone (Dilaudid), Ketamine, Laxatives, Levo-alpha-acetylmethadol (LAAM), Meperidine, Meprobamate, Methamphetamine & other Amphetamines, Methaqualone & related sedative-hypnotics, Methadone, Methcathinone, Morphine, Nicotine, Oxycodone, Opium, Xanax, Paraldehyde (Paral), Phencyclidine (PCP), and Flunitrazepam (Rohypnol).

Drugs have dragged the addicts to the deep dungeons of oblivion. The whole international community that is direly worried about the problem of drug abuse, has given a loud and clear call to medical institutes and organizations to liberate the victims of drug Addiction, Dipsomania & Methomania.

Psychological experts and researchers are always raking their minds to know why people fall prey to drugs. Their studies have divulged that drugs and intoxicants are used to forget or negate the frustrations of life, failures in life, dejected love affairs, depression, or sometimes for fun or adventure.

“Thank the Lord, there’s a ray of hope!” Doctors and researchers have been able to invent some treatments for drug Addiction, Dipsomania & Methomania.

Standard drug Addiction, Dipsomania & Methomania treatment may include behavioral therapy, medications, or a combination of both. Medication therapy includes medical treatment to beat drug Addiction, Dipsomania & Methomania. Behavioral therapy consists of counseling, cognitive therapy, or psychotherapy. The third method, the combination of both, is proving to be the most effective treatment for Addiction, Dipsomania & Methomania recovery.

In medication therapy, for instance, Addiction, Dipsomania & Methomania treatment like methadone, LAAM, and naltrexone are helpful for opium addicted people. Nicotine replacement therapy, nicotine patches, gum, nasal spray and bupropion are quite effective for people addicted to nicotine. Antidepressants, mood stabilizers, or neuroleptics, are helpful for treatment of mental disorders such as depression, anxiety disorder, bipolar disorder, or psychosis.

As drug Addiction, Dipsomania & Methomania is a chronic disorder, there’s no effective short-term treatment for it. It requires a long-term treatment to beat drug Addiction, Dipsomania & Methomania.

Finally, strong will power plays a key role in Addiction, Dipsomania & Methomania treatment and Addiction, Dipsomania & Methomania recovery. Psychotherapists can play an important role in building up the patients’ will to beat drug Addiction, Dipsomania & Methomania.

Martin H. Fischer says, “There is only one reason why men become addicted to drugs, they are weak men. Only strong men are cured, and they cure themselves.”

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