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Babies, Toddlers, Kids & Childrens

 

Postpartum Depression - Coping with the Baby Blues

Postpartum depression, or the Baby Blues, can happen anytime up to a year after the baby is born.

postpartum depression, post partum depression, baby blues

Postpartum depression, or peripartum depresion occurs after a woman gives birth. Within a few hours of giving birth the amount of the two female hormones, estrogen and progesterone, return to their pre pregnancy levels. Many researchers feel that this drop in hormone levels, much like the smaller changes in hormone levels can affect a womans mood just before her menstrual cycle, is one of the causes of postpartum depression.

In some women the levels of thyroid hormones decrease as well. This decrease in these hormones can lead to symptoms of depression too. Some of these symptoms include a depressed mood, a loss of interest in daily things, problems sleeping and fatigue, irritability and weight gain.

Another factor that can lead to postpartum depression is genetics. This type of depression can be passed down from mother to daughter. There is also a correlation between postpartum depression and women who suffer from severe premenstrual syndrome.

Postpartum depsression is also known as the baby blues and one in ten new mothers suffer from this to one degree or another. In addition to the drastic changes in hormone levels, the presence of a new baby in the house is also a major factor in postpartum depression. A new baby can be a major stress on a new mom and this can factor into becoming depressed. Some of these factors include:

Having less free time then before the baby was born and an inability to control the time needed to get things done. The baby demands all the mothers attention, leaving little time for herself.

Going through labor is extremely stressful and tiring for a new mom. A new mom does not have time to regain her strength post delivery because of the demands and needs of the new baby. Just getting a good nights sleep is nearly impossible with late night feedings and diaper changes.

Many new mothers question their own ability to be a good mom. They become overwhelmed with the care the new baby needs and start to worry that they aren't providing the care their baby needs.

For new moms, postpartum depression can occur with a feeling that they are no longer who they used to be. Their old schedule and ways of doing things have been replaced by the needs of their new baby. They can also feel like they have to do it all and try to take care of the new baby while doing all the things they used to do. This can be very overwhelming because chances are the care of the new baby will not allow them to accomplish all that they think they should.

New moms can also become disconnected from their partner and family. They find that their time is limited and they just don't have time to spend with the rest of their family.

For most women the "baby blues" will usually go away as their hormone levels get back to normal. But for some women the depression associated with a new baby does not go away and can steadily get worse. It is very important that women who experince any kind of depression after child birth talk to their doctor right away. Most cases of postpartum depression can be dealt with with medication and some counseling.

 

Postpartum Depression: More Than Just the “Baby Blues”

Research shows that infants of depressed mothers are at increased risk of behavioral problems, emotional difficulties, and delays in growth and language development. If the mother's depression is not treated promptly, the baby can be greatly affected. With a combination of proper medication and therapy, postpartum depression is treatable.

postpartum depression , fear and anxiety, depression, insomnia, counseling

Having a baby can be very challenging for every woman, both physically and emotionally. The birth of a baby can trigger a mix of powerful emotions, from excitement and joy to fear and anxiety. It is natural for many new mothers to have mood swings after delivery, feelings of joy one minute, and moments of sadness the next. But it can also result in something one might not expect like the onset of depression. These feelings are sometimes known as the “baby blues” --- depression that normally fades away within 10 days of delivery. However, some women may experience a deep and ongoing depression which lasts much longer. This is called postpartum depression.

The earliest medical records about postpartum depression dates back to as far as the 4th Century BC. However, despite the early awareness about this form of depression, the postpartum sadness has not always been formally recognized as an illness. As a result, it continues to be under-diagnosed. There is no single cause for depression after childbirth. Physical, emotional, and lifestyle factors may all play a role. Unlike the “baby blues”, postpartum depression does not go away quickly. Very rarely, new moms develop something even more serious. They may stop eating, have trouble sleeping or develop insomnia, and become frantic or paranoid.

Postpartum depression affects 10-28% of new mothers. It can begin days, weeks, or months after delivery. Studies show that depressed mothers are less involved with their infant. They are also shows signs of inconsistentcy in terms of how they respond to their infant. They can be loving and attentive one minute, and withdrawn the next. In addition to the signs mentioned, some other symptoms of postpartum depression may include:

Exhaustion

Excessive sleeping but still feeling exhausted

Loss of sexual interest

Crying spells without obvious cause

Feelings of guilt

Sadness

Anger

Feelings of despair and/or worthlessness

Forgetfulness

Difficulty making decisions

Poor concentration

Treatment for postpartum depression can be as varied as the symptoms. Some of the more common approaches to therapy or treatment include:

Creating a supportive environment for the mother;

Self-Care;

Joining a support groups;

Counseling;

Psychotherapy; and Medication

More often, postpartum depression is not recognized or adequately treated because some normal post-pregnancy changes which cause similar symptoms in new mothers. Moreover, some women do not tell anyone about their symptoms because they feel embarrassed, ashamed, or guilty about being depressed about their pregnancy and childbirth when the normal response would be that of elation or happiness.

Early detection and treatment of postpartum depression is critical not only for the mother but for the infant as well. It can also help if the father or another caregiver can assist in meeting the needs of the baby while the mom is depressed or is still recovering from depression. The less exposure the infant has to the mother's depression, the lower the risk of long-term problems in the child.

Research shows that infants of depressed mothers are at increased risk of behavioral problems, emotional difficulties, and delays in growth and language development. If the mother's depression is not treated promptly, the baby can be greatly affected. Women with postpartum depression may feel like they are bad or inefficient mothers and might become increasingly reluctant to seek professional help. It is crucial to remember that hope and treatment are available to them. With a combination of proper medication and therapy, a woman can overcome postpartum depression and regain the ability to love and care for her newborn child.

 

Postpartum Depression: More Than Just the “Baby Blues”

Research shows that infants of depressed mothers are at increased risk of behavioral problems, emotional difficulties, and delays in growth and language development. If the mother's depression is not treated promptly, the baby can be greatly affected. With a combination of proper medication and therapy, postpartum depression is treatable.

postpartum depression , fear and anxiety, depression, insomnia, counseling

Having a baby can be very challenging for every woman, both physically and emotionally. The birth of a baby can trigger a mix of powerful emotions, from excitement and joy to fear and anxiety. It is natural for many new mothers to have mood swings after delivery, feelings of joy one minute, and moments of sadness the next. But it can also result in something one might not expect like the onset of depression. These feelings are sometimes known as the “baby blues” --- depression that normally fades away within 10 days of delivery. However, some women may experience a deep and ongoing depression which lasts much longer. This is called postpartum depression.

The earliest medical records about postpartum depression dates back to as far as the 4th Century BC. However, despite the early awareness about this form of depression, the postpartum sadness has not always been formally recognized as an illness. As a result, it continues to be under-diagnosed. There is no single cause for depression after childbirth. Physical, emotional, and lifestyle factors may all play a role. Unlike the “baby blues”, postpartum depression does not go away quickly. Very rarely, new moms develop something even more serious. They may stop eating, have trouble sleeping or develop insomnia, and become frantic or paranoid.

Postpartum depression affects 10-28% of new mothers. It can begin days, weeks, or months after delivery. Studies show that depressed mothers are less involved with their infant. They are also shows signs of inconsistentcy in terms of how they respond to their infant. They can be loving and attentive one minute, and withdrawn the next. In addition to the signs mentioned, some other symptoms of postpartum depression may include:

Exhaustion

Excessive sleeping but still feeling exhausted

Loss of sexual interest

Crying spells without obvious cause

Feelings of guilt

Sadness

Anger

Feelings of despair and/or worthlessness

Forgetfulness

Difficulty making decisions

Poor concentration

Treatment for postpartum depression can be as varied as the symptoms. Some of the more common approaches to therapy or treatment include:

Creating a supportive environment for the mother;

Self-Care;

Joining a support groups;

Counseling;

Psychotherapy; and Medication

More often, postpartum depression is not recognized or adequately treated because some normal post-pregnancy changes which cause similar symptoms in new mothers. Moreover, some women do not tell anyone about their symptoms because they feel embarrassed, ashamed, or guilty about being depressed about their pregnancy and childbirth when the normal response would be that of elation or happiness.

Early detection and treatment of postpartum depression is critical not only for the mother but for the infant as well. It can also help if the father or another caregiver can assist in meeting the needs of the baby while the mom is depressed or is still recovering from depression. The less exposure the infant has to the mother's depression, the lower the risk of long-term problems in the child.

Research shows that infants of depressed mothers are at increased risk of behavioral problems, emotional difficulties, and delays in growth and language development. If the mother's depression is not treated promptly, the baby can be greatly affected. Women with postpartum depression may feel like they are bad or inefficient mothers and might become increasingly reluctant to seek professional help. It is crucial to remember that hope and treatment are available to them. With a combination of proper medication and therapy, a woman can overcome postpartum depression and regain the ability to love and care for her newborn child.




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