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Babies, Toddlers, Kids & Childrens

 

Baby Crib Safety - Frequently Asked Questions

The crib is where your baby will spend a lot of their time and you want to be sure they are safe. Below are some of the questions (with the answers) that are asked about crib safety. Topics such as mattress position, how to place your baby in the crib, and general safety standards are discussed, as are other issues. If you need further information you can search the Internet and visit baby furniture stores.

Baby Car Seats

The crib is where your baby will spend a lot of their time and you want to be sure they are safe. Below are some of the questions (with the answers) that are asked about crib safety. Topics such as mattress position, how to place your baby in the crib, and general safety standards are discussed, as are other issues. If you need further information you can search the Internet and visit baby furniture stores.

<b>Q. Are there safety standards for baby cribs?</b>

Yes there are some very exact standards for your baby’s crib. In 1974 it was made law that cribs should no longer be painted with lead based paint. It was discovered that the ingestion of lead (from any source) could cause learning disabilities and other difficulties in young children. The slats of the crib must be no more than 2 3/8 inches apart, this is to prevent your baby from getting his body or head stuck between the bars causing injury or strangulation. The side bar should be 26 inches above the mattress when it is in its lowest position. If your child is more than an inch taller than the sidebar it is time to move him into a regular bed.

<b>Q. Are there some hazards in my baby’s crib that I need to be aware of?</b>

Your mattress must fit snugly in the crib; an ill-fitting mattress could cause your baby to slip between the mattress and the side bar causing suffocation. The mattress height should be able to be adjusted into at least three different levels. When your baby becomes more mobile you will want to put the mattress in the lowest position to prevent your baby from climbing or falling out. The slats should be tight, loose slats could pinch little fingers. Do not put the crib near a window to prevent your baby from possibly falling out or becoming tangled in Venetian blind cords.

<b>Q. What are some historical facts about the crib?</b>

Here is a short chronological time line of crib facts:

1973 - The standard for crib slats was to be no more than 2 3/8th inches apart to prevent your baby from slipping through or getting their head stuck. Also, double latches for drop-down sidebars were to become the norm.

1976 - The standard for cutouts in the crib end panels are presented. The end panels must not have any decorative cutout designs. Children were getting their limbs or heads caught causing serious injury or death.

1978 - Cribs must now be painted with non-toxic finish.

1981 - Two models of cribs with cutouts are recalled.

1988 - A voluntary standard addresses mattress support hardware, failure of glued or bolted connections, drop-side latch failure and loosened teething rails.

1990 - No corner posts or projections can be more than 1/16th of an inch above the drop-side.

1998 - California and Washington mandate that hotel cribs must meet the same standardsset for full-size cribs

1998 - Portable cribs must now meet the same standards as full-sized cribs.

<b>Q. How can I tell when my baby is ready for a regular bed?</b>

When your child stands more than a couple of inches taller than the sidebar with the mattress in the lowest position. If your child is climbing out of the crib, for his safety put him in a regular bed.

<b>Q. How should I put my baby to sleep in his crib?</b>

Place your baby on his back or on his side for sleeping. Use one piece sleepers rather than blankets. Your baby could slip under the blanket and possibly suffocate. Remove all pillows and toys as well, in order to prevent suffocation.

<b>Q. Is it safe to cover my baby with a blanket?</b>

A blanket sleeper will keep your baby sufficiently warm while sleeping. If you absolutely need to use a blanket, tuck it in around the bottom of the mattress. Place your baby with his feet toward the end-panel and the blanket should go no higher than his/her chest.

<b>Q. Is a mesh sided crib safe to use for my baby?</b>

Yes, a mesh crib is safe provided the mesh is less than 1/4 inch in size, smaller than a tiny button on baby’s clothes. The should be rips, tears, or loose threads. If staples are used to attach the mesh they must not be exposed and the mesh must be securely attached to the top rail and the floor plate.

<b>Q. Can I safely use bumper pads in my baby’s crib?</b>

While bumper pads are not necessary, they can safely be used. They must be very close the edge of the mattress and properly secured. The bumpers must be flat and not puffy, as your baby could get stuck between the bumper and the mattress and suffocate.

<b>Q. What can I do to keep my baby’s crib safe?</b>

In order to keep your baby’s a safe place, you should make sure to all connections are secure and that there are no broken or missing parts. Regularly, check the teething rail for splits or cracks. Make sure the mattress spring support and your crib will withstand your baby’s increasing mobility. The mattress itself should have no splits, tears, or holes.

<b>Q. How can I tell when it’s time to lower the mattress?</b>

When your baby becomes more active, when s/he begins to pull himself to a standing position or when he sits up alone it will be time to lower the mattress to prevent your little one from either climbing out or falling out.

<b>Q. Can I hang a mobile over my baby’s crib?</b>

Mobiles and crib gyms can be used to entertain your baby but when your child is able to get on to their hands and knees or pull themselves up. This will prevent your baby from becoming entangled in them.

<b>In Conclusion</b>

Making sure your baby’s crib is safe, is an ongoing to task. Proper positioning of the mattress, making sure all connections are secure and that there are no loose slats that could pinch little fingers will help to keep your baby’s crib a safe place for him to be.Be sure to place him in the crib on his back or side and dress him in a sleeper rather than using a blanket. Keeping these tips in mind will help keep your baby safe and give you some peace of mind.

 

Baby Cribs Safety - Better Safe Than Sorry

It is a sad fact but one we have to come to grips with, not all baby cribs are safe. Baby cribs are supposed to keep your baby safe during sleep but did you know that when badly constructed or improperly assembled a baby crib can be a serious hazard to your child? No matter how expensive the baby crib is parents should use caution when choosing a crib for the nursery, and should follow instructions to the letter.

baby,Babies, Toddlers, Kids & Childrens,cribs,nursery,furniture

It is a sad fact but one we have to come to grips with, not all baby cribs are safe. Baby cribs are supposed to keep your baby safe during sleep but did you know that when badly constructed or improperly assembled a baby crib can be a serious hazard to your child? No matter how expensive the baby crib is parents should use caution when choosing a crib for the nursery, and should follow instructions to the letter.

One of the biggest mistakes some people make is they "assume" that all cribs are safe, but whether you are using a brand new baby crib that you just bought a couple of months ago from a reputable store or recycling the one that you used for your older kids, or a second hand one from a garage sale it is important that you closely inspect the crib for hazardous possibilities as they may be lurking in places that you would not even consider remotely dangerous! Here are some tips that can help keep your child safe in a baby crib.

<b>Close inspection</b>
When buying a baby crib or when you are about to use one, make sure that everything is in place and there are no broken or bent parts. Sharp edges, missing joints and small removable parts in baby cribs can also be dangerous as they can be choking hazards.

Side edges and protrusions can also become strangulation hazards as blankets, necklaces and shirts can be caught. Never buy or use cribs that have these flaws.

<b>Follow the instructions</b>
Never believe that for one-minute you know everything about baby cribs just because you have used one before. And no matter how much knowledge you think you have, it is still imperative that you read the manual and instruction guide.

In addition to providing the step-by-step guide on how to set-up the baby crib from the box, the manual will also contain some tips on how to properly care for your crib and to avoid accidents while using it.

<b>Non-toxic finishes</b>
The baby cribs finish should be made with non-toxic materials that are recommended for young children. As Babies, Toddlers, Kids & Childrens’ body systems, especially the immu
ne systems are still developing, it is important that they be protected from chemicals and toxins in the environment. When buying a used baby crib, make sure that the finish is sound and not flaking or peeling, also if it looks like it has been refinished you may want to find a different crib as it would be impossible to know for sure whether it was refinished with a child safe non-toxic material.

<b>Drop sides</b>
Though the dropside mechanism in baby cribs can be very convenient, it can also spell disaster if not working correctly or the latches are not secure. Be sure that when you do put your baby inside the crib, you have raised the drop side and the latches are secured. Some parents may remember to raise it up but forget to secure it, which can lead to accidents.

<b>Keep the crib uncluttered</b>
Remember that the more things inside the baby crib, the greater the chances of an accident, I'm sure you're generally aware that anything can be a potential choking and strangulation hazard. To help avoid this, keep the baby crib to a bare minimum, only placing things that are absolutely necessary like a pillow and a blanket. Toys inside the crib are okay if your baby is awake and playing under supervision, but always remember to remove them when sleeping. Parents are also advised to avoid placing dangling toys on the side of the crib as loose straps may capture your baby and create a strangulation hazard.

<b>Check for alerts and call-backs</b>
The Consumer Product Safety Commission lists safety tips, alerts and call-back warnings on baby cribs on their website at www.cpsc.gov and should be followed.

 

Baby Cribs Safety Checklist

Once your baby has arrived, one of the most important parts of your new life together will be getting a good night’s sleep — you in your bed, the baby in a safe and comfortable crib. At first, you may want your newborn to sleep in a bassinet by your bed, making it a little easier for breastfeeding moms, but have a crib ready by the time your baby can roll over.

furniture, baby furniture, baby, crib

Congratulations! You’ve got a baby on the way!
Once your baby has arrived, one of the most important parts of your new life together will be getting a good night’s sleep — you in your bed, the baby in a safe and comfortable crib. At first, you may want your newborn to sleep in a bassinet by your bed, making it a little easier for breastfeeding moms, but have a crib ready by the time your baby can roll over.

Your baby will spend more time in the crib than anywhere else, so safety is of utmost importance. What makes a crib safe?

* The bars or slats of the crib railing should be no more than 2-3/8" apart, close enough together to prevent your baby’s head from slipping through or getting stuck. That crib in the attic may be a beautiful antique, but it probably does not meet this safety standard. Secondhand older cribs may also have splinters or lead paint as well as slats that are too far apart.

* Cribs with cutout designs along the rail may look pretty, but your baby’s arm or neck could get stuck in them.

* The crib must be sturdy. Your child will sleep in a crib until it’s time to move into a regular bed between the ages of 2 and 3. When shopping for the crib, give it a good shake to see if it wobbles or rattles.

* Construction materials should be stained or painted hardwoods like maple, ash, beech or oak. The use of inferior woods can potentially weaken or warp the slats. Some metal cribs are also very sturdy and secure. All finish materials must be lead free and non-toxic.

* For safety, the dropsides must be at least 9" above the mattress support when lowered. When the side is raised, the top must be at least 26" above the support at its lowest position. You should have no trouble quietly raising and lowering the side rail easily with one hand, since chances are you’ll have a sleeping baby in your arms.

* Make things a little easier on your back by choosing a crib with an adjustable height mattress. A newborn can rest higher in the crib, while a baby who can sit up needs a lower mattress so he can’t climb out. You can change the height of most mattresses by simply raising or lowering the mattress support.

* Check the hardware on the crib for sharp edges or points or anything else that could hurt your baby.

* The mattress should fit snugly into the crib. If you can fit two fingers between the side of the mattress and the crib, it is too small. Keep an eye on foam mattresses; over time, they may break down at the edges and leave gaps. Check the mattress support to make sure there are safety clips that lock the hangers into their notches.

* Use nonflammable and hypoallergenic bumper padding attached to the inside railings of the crib to cushion all four sides and prevent your baby from sticking an arm or leg through the railings. Securely fasten the bumper pads to the sides of the crib in at least six places. Be sure to remove bumper pads when your baby becomes more active.

* Follow assembly instructions carefully. Periodically tighten all nuts, bolts, and screws and check teething rails for cracks. Check the mattress support hooks regularly.

* Don’t place a crib against a window, near curtains or drapery cords, or near furniture that could help your baby climb out.

* Crib toys need to be removed from the crib when baby is sleeping. And remove mobiles when baby is able to grab at objects.

Federal safety guidelines went into effect in 1973, but only since 1991 do most cribs meet all mandatory safety standards (16CFR part 1508) as set by The Consumer Products Safety Commission (CPSC) and the voluntary standards (ASTM F966 and F1169) as set by the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM). The Juvenile Products Manufacturers’ Association (JPMA) certifies cribs that meet the safety standards.

For more information on crib safety and other nursery equipment, contact the Consumer Products Safety Commission at 1-800-638-2772.




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