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How to Write a Resume for Your First Job

Writing a resume for your first job requires patience, attention to detail, and a little creativity. All job seekers need a strong resume if they want to compete for the best jobs. New professionals, especially, need to work even harder to sell themselves to managers.

job, jobs, career, careers, employment, recruitment, resume, resumes, interview, interviews

Writing a resume for your first job requires patience, attention to detail, and a little creativity. All job seekers need a strong resume if they want to compete for the best jobs. But while seasoned professionals can rely on their experience to generate initial interest from prospective employers, individuals hitting the job market for the first time do not have such a luxury. New professionals, therefore, need to work even harder to sell themselves to managers.

To start your resume, you will need to select a resume format. A functional resume is usually the best choice for a new professional, since it allows you to present your qualifications by functional skills as opposed to purely chronological job order. Since your work history will be brief, if not non-existent, you want to place the emphasis on your skills and knowledge.

Layout of a Functional Resume:
The layout you select for your resume should attract attention and create interest, but not detract from your overall presentation. Use of capitalization, bold lettering, underlining, indentations, different fonts, and white space can add variety to your resume and emphasize important information. The layout should be consistent throughout the individual sections of the resume, be visually appealing, and be easy for the reader to follow.
A functional resume has several parts, which are typically included in this order:
Name and Contact Information
Objective Statement
Education
Key Skills and Qualifications
Work Experience

Additional parts may include a section for Awards and Honors or References.

Name and Contact Information

You should include your name, full address, telephone number with area code, and email address (if applicable) at the very top of your resume. If you are currently residing at a temporary address, such as a student’s college address, you may include it in addition to your permanent address depending on the circumstances.

Objective Statement

If you choose to include an objective statement, it should be a concise and meaningful statement that describes your career goals in detail. An objective can include your goals in regards to your desired position title, industry, level of responsibility, and desired utilized skills. The elements included in your objective should be reinforced and supported throughout your resume and your cover letter.

A major mistake that many new professionals make is that they use a generalized objective statement. This is due to the fact that many men and women new to the workforce may not necessarily know what they are seeking in a position. They fear that by limiting the scope of the objective, that they are knocking themselves out of the running for positions that do not neatly match their objective – positions that they might otherwise be interesting in pursuing.

While this is true in some cases, it is advisable to either keep your objective focused and narrow, or completely leave it off your resume. A weak, unfocused objective in effect says nothing and will actually detract from your overall presentation.

Education

If you have a college degree, you should position the Education section near the top of your resume before your Key Skills and Qualifications. If you do not have a degree, the Education section should follow your Key Skills and Qualifications.

Your highest level of education achieved, whether you completed the program or not, should be the first listed in this section. All other schools you attended should follow.

For each individual school, list the following:
Name of the school
Dates you attended or graduated
Degrees earned (or degree program you were in, if not completed)
Major and minor subject areas

You may also list any honors, awards, Dean's list commendations, and GPAs if they will enhance this section of your resume. Any certifications or completed training courses that that are relevant to the position you are seeking should also be included.

Newer graduates can include a list of completed courses that are directly relevant to the type of position you are seeking. For example, a newly graduated Accounting major may want to highlight her course in Financial Accounting, Management Accounting, and Tax Accounting.

You should only include high school information if you do not have a college degree or if you achieved high commendation in some area that reinforces your career objectives.

Key Skills and Qualifications

This is the most critical section of a functional resume. The Skills section of your resume should highlight any relevant skills that might not otherwise be disclosed on your resume. This section will be highly individualized to both the person and the position they are seeking.

First, identify the key skills relevant to the type of position you are seeking. Some examples of key skills include customer relations, graphic design, marketing, leadership, and computer technology skills. It may be necessary to develop several different versions of your resume so that you are able effectively market yourself to a variety of jobs.

Next, rank the key skills in order of importance – you want the most important skill to appear at the top of your skills list. Then, under each of these key skill categories, include any information about yourself that demonstrates how you possess this skill. You can draw from any work experience, volunteer experience, schooling, extracurricular activities, or any other area as appropriate. As with the key skills themselves, rank this in order of importance so that the most relevant examples appear first.

Examples of key skills with supporting documentation are as follows:

Research
Designed questionnaire to assess customer needs
Identified sample population to be included in the study
Drafted analysis plan
Prepared survey results report and presented the results to the study team

Marketing and Distribution
Developed layout and organization of merchandise for a 25-page giftware catalog
Maintained accurate, up-to-date computer records of merchandise inventory, suppliers, customers, and shipping vendors.
Handled all facets of order receipt, processing, and fulfillment

Work Experience

Since you are new to the workforce, employers do not expect you to have much in terms of work experience. This section should be very brief. You should not provide any details of your responsibilities and accomplishments in this section (these should have been included under Key Skills and Qualifications). Instead, simply list your job title, the name of the employer, the location of the position, and your dates of employment as follows:

2004 – Present Customer Service Representative ABC Telecommunications
Baltimore, MD
2003 – 2004 Treasurer Omega Lambda Pi Fraternity
Baltimore, MD
2001 – 2003 Sales Assistant Magellan Imports
Washington, D.C.

Other Optional Sections:

Honors and Awards:
List any career, academic, leadership or athletic honors you have received. Academic awards may alternatively be listed under the Education section of the resume.

References:
You may include a statement declaring “References Available upon Request” if you need to fill space on your resume. Otherwise you should list references in a separate document. References should typically only be provided when requested or once it is clear that the competition for a position is narrowing. Do not include specific reference names or contact information on your resume.

Other Categories:
If there is additional information that you feel is important to include butt does not fit into any of these categories, you can create custom categories. Examples of custom categories may include Background, Professional Activities, and Recitals/Art Shows.

 

How To Write A Resume That Will Impress That Employer

Your resume is the first impression that an employer has of you. A great resume has the ability to persuade an employer that you have the unique talent and experience desired and that you deserve a personal interview for the position.

job, jobs, career, careers, employment, recruitment, resume, resumes, interview, interviews, trucker, truckers, trucking, truck driving, driving

Your resume is the first impression that an employer has of you. At the most basic level, a resume is simply a description of the skills, experience, education, and professional achievements that make you qualified for a position. A good resume will accurately inform an employer about your background. A great resume, however, can do much more. A great resume has the ability to persuade an employer that you have the unique talent and experience desired and that you deserve a personal interview for the position.

So how do you write a great resume? There is no one right way to write a resume, but common practice has developed a standard or resumes that candidates would do well to observe. Keep in mind that a resume is a marketing tool – you are marketing yourself to prospective employers. Therefore, although you do not want to significantly deviate from accepted standards, the content and format of your resume should express your individuality.

The Format:
The format you select for your resume should attract attention and create interest, but not detract from your overall presentation. Use of capitalization, bold lettering, underlining, indentations, different fonts, and white space can add variety to your resume and emphasize important information. The format should be consistent throughout the individual sections of the resume, be visually appealing, and be easy for the reader to follow.
A resume has several parts, which are typically included in this order:

1 Name and Contact Information

2 Objective Statement

3 Education

4 Professional Experience

5 Skills

Additional parts may include a section for Summary of Skills, Awards and Honors, or References.

Name and Contact Information

You should include your name, full address, telephone number with area code, and email address (if applicable) at the very top of your resume. If you are currently residing at a temporary address, such as a student’s college address, you may include it in addition to your permanent address depending on the circumstances.

Objective Statement

If you choose to include a professional objective statement, it should be a concise and meaningful statement that describes your career goals in detail. An objective can include your goals in regards to your desired position title, industry, level of responsibility, and desired utilized skills. The elements included in your objective should be reinforced and supported throughout your resume and your cover letter.

Education, Certifications, and Career Training

Your highest level of education achieved, whether you completed the program or not, should be the first listed in this section. All other schools you attended should follow.

For each individual school, list the following:

Name of the school

Dates you attended or graduated

Degrees earned (or degree program you were in, if not completed)

Major and minor subject areas

You may also list any honors, awards, Dean's list commendations, and GPAs if they will enhance this section of your resume.

Next you should list any career specific certifications or completed training courses that that support your objective statement and enhance your resume. Be careful not to overdo this section, though, since too much information in this section will detract from the most important section of he resume, the Professional Experience section.

You should only include high school information if you do not have a college degree or if you achieved high commendation in some area that reinforces your career objectives.

*** NOTE ***
If you have a college degree, you should position the Education section near the top of your resume before your Professional Experience. If you do not have a degree, the Education section should follow your Professional Experience.

Professional Experience

This is the most critical section of the resume. The professional experience section should be tailored as much as possible to the target position and should focus on those key areas that relate to your desired career goals. If the bulk of your experience can be directly correlated to your desired position, then you can stick to a single Professional Experience section. If your career path is divided, though, it may be necessary to split your experience between a section detailing your experience in the desired area (for example, “Professional Teaching Experience” or “Professional Writing Experience”) and a section for “Other Experience”.

To write an effective professional experience section, consider the following tips:

Include your job title, the name of the employer, the location of the position (city, state), and the dates you were employed.

If you want the emphasis to be on your title, list this first. If where is worked is more important than what you did, you should list the name of the employer first.

You can de-emphasize the dates of employment by omitting the months if you feel that including them will detract from your presentation.

This section is not strictly limited to full-time professional positions only. Take advantage of this flexibility and include any full-time or part-time positions, related volunteer work, relevant campus, and internships that best reflect your skills.

For each position, use detailed actions words and adjectives to describe your responsibilities, new abilities you developed, and any skills you applied.

Include any specific accomplishments you achieved for each position, as well as any accolades you received for your work. For example, if you were Salesperson of the Year or achieved the highest rating on a customer satisfaction survey, be sure to include it. Remember, you are trying to market yourself!

Be details in your descriptions without exaggerating. DO NOT LIE ON YOUR RESUME!

Skills

The Skills section of your resume should highlight any relevant skills that might not otherwise be disclosed on your resume. This section will be highly individualized to both the person and the position they are seeking.

You should list those skills most relevant to the position you are seeking at the top of this section.

Examples of some skills you may want to include are:

Computer skills: specific computer systems, applications, and programs

Languages: your level of proficiency in reading, writing and speaking various languages

Various functional skills: any functional skills not mentioned elsewhere such as editing skills, interpersonal relationship skills, negotiating skills, etc.

Industry experience: any industries in which you have worked

Other Optional Sections:

Summary of Skills:
A quick 3-4 line summary of your relevant qualifications for the position may be included at the top for the resume under your contact information and objective statement (if included). The key is to be as specific as possible and tailor the summary to the position.

Honors and Awards:
List any career, academic, leadership or athletic honors you have received. Academic awards may alternatively be listed under the Education section of the resume.

References:
You may include a statement declaring “References Available upon Request” if you need to fill space on your resume. Otherwise you should list references in a separate document. References should typically only be provided when requested or once it is clear that the competition for a position is narrowing. Do not include specific reference names or contact information on your resume.

Other Categories:
If there is additional information that you feel is important to include butt does not fit into any of these categories, you can create custom categories. Examples of custom categories may include Background, Professional Activities, Recitals/Art Shows, Professional Memberships, Presentations, Publications, and Special Skills.

 

How To Write The Best Teacher Resume You Can

It should come as no surprise that there is a currently a shortage of teachers in the United States. The need for teachers has never been greater. Though this trend is good news for teachers on the job market, it does not diminish the fact that competition will remain tough for the most desirable teaching positions.

teacher, teachers, teaching, educator, educators, education, school, college, university, job, jobs, career, careers, employment, recruitment

It should come as no surprise that there is a currently a shortage of teachers in the United States. This unfortunate trend has been seen for well over a decade. To compound the issue, recent labor studies have predicted that teaching positions will likely continue to grow faster than the national average for the next several years due to recent government regulations to reduce class size and increase educational accountability. The need for teachers has never been greater.

Though this trend is good news for teachers on the job market, it does not diminish the fact that competition will remain tough for the most desirable teaching positions. Competition is especially fierce for English, Social Science, Humanities, and Elementary grade positions. Teacher will need to pay close attention to the presentation of their credentials, as detailed in their resume, in order to ensure that they can compete in the race for prime positions in the educational system.

To write a solid resume tailored specifically for teaching opportunities, consider the following guidelines:

Highlight your Educational and Licensure Qualifications

In addition to including the details of your teaching or academic degree (school name, when you graduated, your degree), you should mention any academic honors, grants, scholarships, or fellowships awarded during the course of your studies.

If you are an experienced teacher, you should include any relevant continuing education courses or seminars you have taken to demonstrate to prospective employers that you are keeping your skills sharp.

If you are a newer graduate or have limited teaching experience, a list of related education courses and any completed student teacher or mentorship rotations will enhance your qualifications to prospective employers. Graduates who completed their degree with an impressive grade point average should highlight this fact by including their GPA in the Educational section of their resume.

All teachers who have completed the process and testing requirements to get their teaching license will need to provide details of their license(s) in this section. Include the state(s) and subject area(s) in which you are licensed to teach and the date that your license went in effect. Since your employer will ask for a copy of your license once you are made an offer, you do not need to include your licensing number on your resume unless otherwise requested.

Emphasize your Teaching Expertise and Key Skills

A quick 10-second scan of your resume should reveal important keywords that summarize your teaching experience and give school administrators an overview of your qualifications. The most effective way to do this is to incorporate a section of your resume dedicated to teaching expertise and key skills. Include a bulleted list of your subject area specializations (such as biology, mathematics, special education, or K-3) and any pertinent teaching skills, such as curriculum development or teaching to style, that will enhance your resume presentation.

If you have several years of teaching experience, it may beneficial to list your years of experience in each area. For example, indicate that you have three years of experience teaching high school biology, two years of experience teaching middle school general science, and one year of experience teaching high school earth science.

Entry-level teachers and teachers with limited experience should also include this section in their resume, highlighting those areas and schools acquired from schooling, student teaching rotations, working as a student aid, and teaching mentorships.

Detail Your Teaching Experience

Since most school administrators hire teachers based on their previous experience in (or knowledge of if you are a new teacher) a particular subject area or grade level, prospective employers will need to know the details of your teaching experience.

If you are an experienced teacher, you should detail your subject area expertise, the type of educational system you worked in (public, charter, or private school), the grades you taught at each assignment, and your class size for each of your previous employers.

If you are an entry-level teacher just out of school or a teacher with limited work experience, you should detail any practicums, student teaching, student aid work, volunteering, tutoring, mentorships, or other unpaid work you were involved in during your schooling.

Demonstrate You're a Top Performer

Employers love to hire the cream of the crop, and educators are no exceptions. School administrators will be looking for teachers who are willing to contribute to the betterment of the school outside of just their day-to-day teaching responsibilities. In fact, many experienced teachers would argue that a significant part of the teaching career was went doing things outside of the classroom. Therefore, it is imperative that you demonstrate that you are a top performer.

Your resume will be more memorable and better received if you can detail specific contributions you made to each of your previous employers. What have you done that was above and beyond your basic responsibilities? How have you helped make a positive impact on your students and their families, your fellow co-workers, your school or school system, or even your community?

Consider your possible involvement in:

--Committees or review boards

--After school programs including school sports, academic teams, or clubs

--Fundraisers

--Community education drives

--Literacy board

--New teacher mentorships

--Cross-training in different subject areas

--The launch of a new school or program

--Outside education

The more details you can provide about your involvement in the educational community and your accomplishments, the better job you will do at impressing your value as a team member to potential employers.




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