Home Articles Blog Updates Subjects Topics Tips & Guides New Contact Us
adblock creatives to be added later Loose weight without medicines, step by step

Improve your sex life -- overcome your frustration

Survive in Bed Click Here!

Increase your breast size by 2 cups, naturally and without surgery Click Here!
This Single Mother Makes Over $700 per Week Helping Businesses With Their Facebook and Twitter Accounts. You too can earn extra money. Click Here!

Earn money with simple online job works. Click Here!

Discounts at Amazon.com

Eliminate your diabetes, we can help you destroy your diabetes

Self improvement and motivational guru gives simple tips to success - must listen

A foolproof, science based diet that will reduce your weight by 12 to 23 pound Click Here!

Blog

TITLE AND SUBJECT OF ARTICLE

 

How To Make Easy Sourdough Bread

Sourdough simply uses wild yeast in place of commercial yeast to leaven the bread. It relies on the wild yeasts that are in the air all around us and cultures those yeasts in a warm, wet environment created with water, flour, and sometimes other components.

When creating a sourdough starter, we always felt like we were on an expedition trying to trap invisible yeastie beasties with our flour and water concoctions. Because we couldn’t see the beasties, we were never sure ...

flour, baking, guide, bread, cake, sourdough, sourdough bread, homemade, home made, knead, kneading

Sourdough simply uses wild yeast in place of commercial yeast to leaven the bread. It relies on the wild yeasts that are in the air all around us and cultures those yeasts in a warm, wet environment created with water, flour, and sometimes other components.

When creating a sourdough starter, we always felt like we were on an expedition trying to trap invisible yeastie beasties with our flour and water concoctions. Because we couldn’t see the beasties, we were never sure what we had captured. While usually successful, we never felt like we were in control. Maybe that is the way sourdough bread should feel, a symbiosis with nature.

But there is an easier way: use commercial yeast in the starter. I know, that’s heresy to the sourdough bread zealot but we only care about the bread. Using commercial yeast is easier, it’s the alcohol from the long cool fermentation that creates the sourdough-like flavor, and the wild yeasts will eventually take over the starter anyway. Because it's easy, it’s no big deal if you abandon your starter after a few weeks; you can readily start another when you’re back in the mood or have the time.

Using this recipe for sourdough bread, a small amount of yeast is used in the starter. As the starter is used and refreshed with new feedings of flour and water, wild yeasts are introduced and cultivated.

Here is the recipe:

For the starter:

1 cup warm water (about 110 degrees)
1/4 teaspoon yeast
1 cup high gluten unbleached flour.

Mix the starter in a glass or steel bowl, cover with plastic wrap, and set it aside at room temperature until it is doubled and bubbly, maybe 4 to 6 hours.

For the sponge:

A sponge is a pre-ferment, a wet mixture of flour and yeast that acts as an incubation chamber to grow yeast at the desired rate. It is added to the dough.
1 cup of the starter
3/4 cup warm water
2 cups flour

Mix the one cup starter with the flour and water, cover, and set aside to ferment until it has tripled in volume. At room temperature, it will take four to eight hours. You can put it in a cool place--about fifty degrees--and let it perk all night. (In the winter, your garage may be just right.) You can also put it in the refrigerator overnight. At temperatures of forty degrees, the yeast will be inactive but the friendly bacteria will still be working and enhance the sour flavor of the bread. If you retard the growth with lower temperatures (“retard” is the correct term for slowing the growth of the yeast), simply bring the sponge to room temperature and let it expand to three times its original volume before proceeding.

For the dough:

All of the sponge
11/2 cups flour (more or less)
2 teaspoons salt

Mix the salt with the flour. Knead the combination into the sponge by hand until you have a smooth, elastic, slightly sticky dough, adding more flour as needed. Put the dough in an oiled bowl and let it rise again until doubled, about an hour.

Bakers note: Notice that the salt is not added until the last stage. Salt in the sponge would inhibit yeast growth.

Form the loaves:

Though you can make this bread in pans, it works best as a large freestanding round or oval loaf or two smaller loaves. Place a clean cotton cloth in a bowl or basket in which to hold the loaf. Lightly dust the interior of the bowl with flour. Place each formed loaf upside down in a bowl on top of the dusted flour. Cover the loaves with plastic and let them rise again until doubled. This rising will probably take less than an hour.

Bakers note: You want a light dusting of flour on the cloth to be transferred to the bread, not a heavy caking. Softly sifting flour from a strainer is the easiest way to achieve an even coating.

If you choose to bake the bread in pans, omit this step. Instead, let the dough rise in a greased bowl covered with plastic until doubled. Form the loaves for pans, place the loaves in greased pans, and let rise until well-expanded and puffy. Bake at 350 degrees until done, about 30 minutes.

To bake crusty bread:

To form the thick, chewy crust that is typical of artisan breads, follow these instructions: Place a large, shallow, metal pan in the oven on the lowest shelf. You will pour hot water in this pan to create steam in the oven. (High heat is hard on pans so don't use one of your better pans and don’t use a glass or ceramic pan which might shatter.) An old sheet pan is ideal. Fill a spray bottle with water. You will use this to spray water into the oven to create even more steam.

Preheat the oven to 425 degrees. When the oven is hot and the bread is fully risen and is soft and puffy--being very careful not to burn yourself with the rising steam and with a mitted hand—turn your head away and pour two or three cups of very hot water in the pan in the oven. Quickly close the oven door to capture the steam. With spray bottle in hand, open the door and quickly spray the oven walls to create more steam and close the door. The oven is now ready for the loaves.

Work quickly to get the bread in the oven before the steam subsides. Gently invert the loaf or loaves onto a slightly greased non-insulated baking sheet on which a little cornmeal has been dusted. With your sharpest knife, quickly make two or three slashes 1/4-inch deep across the top of each loaf. This will vent the steam in the bread and allow the bread to expand properly. Immediately, put the bread in the steamy oven. After a few moments, open the door and spray the walls again to recharge the steam. Do this twice more during the first fifteen minutes of baking. This steamy environment will create the chewy crust prized in artisan breads.

Let the bread bake at 425 degrees for fifteen minutes in the hot steamy oven and then reduce the temperature to 375 degrees and bake for a total of 35 to 40 minutes. Check on the bread ten minutes before the baking should be complete. If the top is browning too quickly, tent the loaf with aluminum foil for the remainder of the baking to keep it from burning. The bread is done when the crust turns a dark golden brown and the internal temperature reaches 210 degrees. It is important that the bread is well-baked to drive moisture from the loaf. If the bread is under baked, the excess moisture will migrate to the crust and you will no longer have the dry chewy crust of a great artisan loaf.

This sourdough bread is to die for. The prolonged rising gives the yeast plenty of time to convert the starch to sugars and the friendly bacteria a chance to impart their nut-like flavors.

Storing your crusty bread:

Unused crusty bread should be stored in a paper bag at room temperature. If the bread is stored in a plastic bag, the crust will become soft.

Copyright 2003-2007, The Prepared Pantry (http://www.prepraredpantry.com ). Published by permission

 

How to Make French Toast - You Can Do That

Let me explain. I run a do-it-yourself blog and most of the time I tend to write or find articles on DIY projects that relate to home improvement or auto repair. I thought it would be fun to write an article on something a lot different, like cooking. I chose this topic because my wife makes the best french toast and I thought there may be folks out there wanting a few pointers.

How to Make French Toast

Copyright 2006 Dennis Watson

Let me explain. I run a do-it-yourself blog and most of the time I tend to write or find articles on DIY projects that relate to home improvement or auto repair. I thought it would be fun to write an article on something a lot different, like cooking. I chose this topic because my wife makes the best french toast and I thought there may be folks out there wanting a few pointers. It's an easy and fun project for the kids as well, they will have fun coming up with different toppings. So sit back and feel your mouth start to water.

As I mentioned making french toast is an easy and tasty breakfast. My wife always makes french toast when she needs to use up bread that's on the verge of becoming just a little too old. The ingredients listed below will make 5 or 6 slices french toast.

Ingredients: 2 eggs - 1/2 c. milk - 1/2 tsp. vanilla - 1/8 tsp. cinnamon - 6 slices bread - 1 tbsp. (or more, as needed) butter - maple syrup, jam, powdered sugar, whipped cream, or chocolate syrup (for topping)

Go ahead and put the oven on to warm in order to keep the first few pieces hot. Then beat the eggs, milk, vanilla and cinnamon in a shallow bowl or small baking pan. Dip bread into egg mixture and coat both sides. Melt butter in skillet over medium heat. Don't get the skillet to hot. Add bread in batches and cook 2 to 3 minutes on each side, or until golden brown. Add more butter as needed. As mentioned in step 1, keep the cooked slices warm in the oven until all the toast is ready. Serve the toast warm with maple syrup, jam, powdered sugar, whipped cream, or chocolate syrup. For a different flavor, add a pinch of nutmeg to the listed ingredients. Just a pinch though because nutmeg has a strong flavor. You can substitute pumpkin or apple pie spice in the place of the cinnamon if you are feeling frisky.

Here is a tip staged from the wife, be careful to not over saturate the bread in preparation. It can make the bread stick to the skillet if you are not careful.

That's all there is to it. This simple and easy dish is great for when you have over-night guest and want to break from the normal eggs and bacon routine and it also makes a great change from your normal dinner planning. So put on your apron and get cooking...enjoy and have fun.

 

How To Make Kaiser Rolls

Want to impress your family and friends at the next gathering? Serve sandwiches on Kaiser Rolls. They’ll look so professional--like they came from the bakery. You don’t have to tell them how easy they were. If you can make dinner rolls, you can make Kaiser Rolls.

You can make Kaiser Rolls out of any lean bread dough but if you would like to make your rolls from a mix, we suggest using our Sunday Dinner Rolls. Simply leave the butter out and add another half-tablespoon of ...

rolls, Kaiser, dinner rolls, how to, crusty, baking

Want to impress your family and friends at the next gathering? Serve sandwiches on Kaiser Rolls. They’ll look so professional--like they came from the bakery. You don’t have to tell them how easy they were. If you can make dinner rolls, you can make Kaiser Rolls.

You can make Kaiser Rolls out of any lean bread dough but if you would like to make your rolls from a mix, we suggest using our Sunday Dinner Rolls. Simply leave the butter out and add another half-tablespoon of water. To make it even easier, we’ll knock 33% off the price of our Sunday Dinner Rolls.

A Kaiser Roll is merely a lean roll, specially shaped, and baked in a steamy oven to make it crusty. Choose a recipe or mix for a lean bread dough—or leave the butter or oil out of the recipe. Make per the directions for rolls including letting the dough rise the first time.

Here’s how to shape the rolls:

Step 1:
Cut a piece of dough off about twice what you would use for a dinner roll. (We scale the dough at 3.5 ounces for our sandwich rolls.) Roll the dough out into a rope about eight inches long.

Step 2:
Form a simple over-hand knot in the center of the dough. Leave the knot loose; do not try to draw it tight. You will have two protruding ends a couple inches long.

Step 3:
Take one of the ends and continue it around the rope and push it down through the center hole. It should look like the picture to the right.

Step 4:
Take the other end of the dough, go around the rope, and push the end up through the center hole. The finished roll should look like the one to the right.

It’s more complicated to try to describe the forming process than it is to form the rolls. After the first couple, you’ll breeze right through without even thinking.

Now let the formed rolls rise covered on a baking sheet. When they are ready to bake, brush them with a whisked egg and one tablespoon water, then sprinkle them with sesame or poppy seeds. You can bake them as you would dinner rolls but if you would like crusty roll like true Kaiser Rolls, follow the direction for baking breads in a steamy oven.

To form the thick, chewy crust that is typical of artisan breads, follow these instructions: Place a large, shallow, metal pan in the oven on the lowest shelf. You will pour hot water in this pan to create steam in the oven. High heat is hard on pans so don’t use one of your better pans. An old sheet pan is ideal. Fill a spray bottle with water. You will use this to spray water into the oven to create more steam.

Preheat the oven to 450 degrees. When the oven is hot and the bread is fully risen and is soft and puffy--being very careful not to burn yourself with the rising steam and with a mitted hand--pour about two cups of very hot water in the pan in the oven. Quickly close the oven door to capture the steam. With spray bottle in hand, open the door and quickly spray the oven walls and close the door.

Immediately put the bread in the steamy oven. After a few moments, open the door and spray the walls again to recharge the steam. Do this twice more during the first ten minutes of baking. This steamy environment will create the chewy crust prized in artisan breads.

You can use this baking procedure for crusty hearth breads also. For rolls, bake for ten minutes at 450 degrees then lower the temperature to 350 degrees until done. How long you will bake them will depend on how quickly your oven loses heat but it will probably be about ten additional minutes (a total of 20 minutes). As for all hearth breads, the internal temperature of your crusty rolls should be about 210 degrees. (If crusty rolls are not well baked, the internal moisture will migrate to the crust and make it soft.)

You can make Kaiser Rolls out of any lean bread dough or bread mix. If you are using a bread mix or recipe that calls for butter or oil, leave it out. If the recipe calls for two tablespoons of butter, substitute one tablespoon of water or what is needed to make a soft, barely sticky dough.

Copyright 2003-2007, The Prepared Pantry (http://www.prepraredpantry.com ). Published by permission




sourdough bread toast kaiser rolls
speaker investment french language
speed up your pc ups
spend time with kids disagreements
sperm production care and increase
spiritual atheist barcode scanner
sportsbook free betting money
spot government finance contracts
spot money millionaire
spray pesticide reduce pollution
spring flower bulbs bloom
spring turkey hunting meals
squeaking in hardwood floor care
staff meetings identify future leaders
stained glass windows conditioners registry
start automate online business mistakes
start build business development
start business and make money
start career paralegal affiliation hosting
start cleaning business
started writting skill sales letter
start free home based business
start internet business
start llc in naveda
start office meetings gotomeetings
start online home business
start own small business
start own successful business
start pet based home business
start succeed online business
start trading forex market
stay at home mom with business
stay calm focus life with goals
stick to routing lose 10 pounds
stop blushing and choose podiatrist
stop email cold calls
stop hair loss using shampoo
stop invest save home foreclosures
storage shed unwanted pounds outdoors
story angle to pitch media
strep throat herpes rejection
stress calm yourself
stress management tips and techniques
stretch student loan consolidation
striking keyword gold with women
stroller feed spider tile stone
student credit cards loans refinancing
student credit repair scams
stutter problem cellulite behavioral therapy
subprime find mortgage protection
subscribe to blogs increase business
succeed in music business
succeed online internet guru
success finish your journey
successful freelance translator
successful home based business
successful hosting business
successful increase online business
successfully acquire buy property
successful networking power
sunless tan aging skin
supercross racing track usa triathlon
improve credit rating record
find perfect hotel deals
credit card report promotion redemption
gain muscle naturally
make money online program e business
google pagerank breakup spouse’s affair
cisco ccna exam lab setup
be singer sing high notes
aviation gifts ecards cookie bouquets
apply credit card wipe outs