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Jobs, Task, Work, Career & Occupation

 

Finding Jobs, Task, Work, Career & Occupation
 Online


Depending on your specific line of work, looking for Jobs, Task, Work, Career & Occupation
 on the Internet could be a great way to find new and interesting opportunities. Whether you are looking for an academic or a technology job, a secretarial or a research position, there are many online resources that can help you find the job you need and the salary you desire. There are a wide variety of Internet job search sites that can steer you in the right direction at little or no cost to the applicant.

If you...

Jobs, Task, Work, Career & Occupation


Depending on your specific line of work, looking for Jobs, Task, Work, Career & Occupation
 on the Internet could be a great way to find new and interesting opportunities. Whether you are looking for an academic or a technology job, a secretarial or a research position, there are many online resources that can help you find the job you need and the salary you desire. There are a wide variety of Internet job search sites that can steer you in the right direction at little or no cost to the applicant.

If you are looking for a job where you currently live, your local newspaper most likely lists its classified ads online. Because some papers make their Internet classifieds free, the online want ads might even include Jobs, Task, Work, Career & Occupation
 that are not featured in the print versions. Rather than thumbing though the actual print paper, you can conduct specialized searches for the exact type of work you are looking for, saving you valuable time in your job quest. Gone are the days of highlighters and inky fingers. Now, you can find job opportunities with the click of a mouse.

There are also job search websites made solely for connecting employers with prospective employees. Sites like Monster.com allow job searchers to post their resumes and their qualifications online for free. These resumes can be made public for anyone to view, or they can be only made available to certain prospective employers. On Internet job search sites, prospective employees can search through thousands of job opportunities online, sorting them by type of job, location or pay rate, while employers search through Posted Resumes To find Matches For Job Openings

Many corporations also have online job sites, especially if they have multiple locations across the country. Computer companies like Apple, IBM and Dell all have job opportunities listed on their websites. Many of these companies pay for relocation, so if you are planning to move from your current location, you should search for a job first. That way, you might be able to get your moving expenses funded by your new employer.

If you prefer working for yourself rather than for a company, the Internet has made the world of freelancing much more feasible for the average worker. If you are a writer, software or website designer, graphic artist or consultant, many companies will hire you to do the modern equivalent of piecework. Rather than paying for a full-time employee, companies will contract individuals to complete projects, typically from home. This offers a lot of flexibility for both the company and the freelancer. If you prefer a flexible schedule and have the need or desire to work from your home or from a coffeehouse or library, freelancing may be the perfect job opportunity for you. Jobs, Task, Work, Career & Occupation
 that can be completed and turned in via email are the best types for freelancers, as they can be completed anywhere even if you are on the road moving from place to place.

The Internet has single-handedly revolutionized the workplace. Not only has it made finding Jobs, Task, Work, Career & Occupation
 easier, but it has also contributed to the general mobility of the workforce. Rather than searching multiple newspapers for Jobs, Task, Work, Career & Occupation
 in different cities, once can now access job databases all over the world from the comfort of your home. Finding opportunities requires less time and sometimes less networking than ever before. With quick transfer of information via email, employers can save time and money, and they have more flexibility in choosing their employees. These days, someone can live on the east coast and work exclusively for a west coast company. Through the Internet, work relationships are now built between people who have never even met.

 

How to Apply for Jobs, Task, Work, Career & Occupation
 Online


The ease and speed of the Internet opens the door of opportunity wider than ever before, especially when it comes to seeking employment opportunities. But how do applicants make a good impression in Cyber Space? This article contains helpful tips for persons submitting job applications online.

apply for Jobs, Task, Work, Career & Occupation
 online, online application, filling out the online application, online applicants

Using an Internet resource to apply for Jobs, Task, Work, Career & Occupation
 online is a great way to get leads you might otherwise have missed. The ease of the Internet makes scanning the job market, applying for positions, and providing résumés quick and easy. Gone are the days of pounding the pavement looking for the perfect job!

<b>Responding to an Ad</b>

Once you find an ad that sounds interesting, ask yourself, “Do my skills, qualifications, and experience make me a good candidate for this position?” If the answer is yes, you are ready to respond to the ad.

Chances are many other job seekers found the same advertisement equally as appealing and will vie for the position, too. For that reason, filling out the online application in such a way as to grab the employer’s attention is a must. Don’t just fill in requested responses; give your responses depth. Remember, the application is in essence a job interview. You want to present yourself as intelligent, bright, and just the right person for the position.

Many employers prefer that job applicants use their company application. Still, you want to make your application unique, to avoid being swallowed up in a growing pile of other applications.

<b>Filling out the Online Application</b>

The National Association of Colleges and Employers recently conducted a survey, posing the question to employers, “How does one make an electronic application outstanding?” At the top of the list was “<i>follow directions…be careful to enter the correct data in the correct field</i>.”

Advice that sounds so simple and basic, it barely seems worth mentioning, yet it is a critical first-step through the door of opportunity. You’d be surprised the number of online applicants who rush through the process, and send the application on its way without going over it a second time. Why would any employer consider hiring someone that didn’t take the time to be sure their application was filled out properly?

The second piece of advice was to tailor the application information to fit the position, instead of copy and pasting text from a generic resume. Use key words, buzz words, and industry jargon – taking cues from the verbiage in the job advertisement as your model.

This is a very important aspect of filling out the online application, because employers do a keyword search when looking for people to fill specific employment positions.

Be specific when asked to describe past employment duties. Instead of saying, “<i>I counted cash drawers</i>,” say “<i>I counted 7 cash drawers daily</i>.” Instead of “<i>oversaw secretary pool</i>,” say “<i>oversaw a secretary pool consisting of 6 full-time and 3 part-time employees</i>.”

<b>What about the Comments Field?</b>

Complete all fields, even if they aren’t required. If the application doesn’t include a job skills-inventory section, create one. This could go in the comments section.

Another use for the comments section is to demonstrate your knowledge of the company or industry. Research it as thoroughly as possible to show your earnest interest in the position for which you are applying.

And above all else, proof read the application before sending it on its way. Do a spell check from your word processor before copying and pasting text in the appropriate field. Also check for grammatical errors.

Remember, when you apply for Jobs, Task, Work, Career & Occupation
 online through employee/employer matchmaking resources such as istaffsolution.com, the online application will be the employer’s first impression of you. Make sure it is a good one!

© 2006 Lori S. Anton for istaffsolution.com

 

How to Apply for a Job Online

In an increasingly online marketplace, applying for Jobs, Task, Work, Career & Occupation
 often means sending your resume and cover letter electronically. Some companies have online application forms right on their Websites.

resume,mail,letter,application,cover letter,online application,your application,your resume,online application forms,resume and cover letter,hiring

In an increasingly online marketplace, applying for Jobs, Task, Work, Career & Occupation
 often means sending your resume and cover letter electronically. Some companies have online application forms right on their Websites. Here, you can choose the job you wish to apply for, plug your work experience, skills, and education into online fields, then submit this information with a single click of a button.

Online application forms differ from another and will require different information. For example, some companies ask that you "copy-and-paste" your resume and cover letter into two fields. Others ask that applicants fill in multiple fields such as "work experience," "education," etc. Still others ask that you do both-submit your resume and cover letter, and fill in fields that require the same employment-related information.

Whatever type of online application form a company might have, be sure that all your information is posted in one field or another. Don't be afraid to repeat information, especially if the form requests a resume and a separate breakdown of your work history. Your information will be automatically uploaded into an online database, where hiring managers will likely scout for keywords. The more times your keywords come up, the better.

While some companies-especially large ones have online application forms, many others simply ask candidates to e-mail their application materials to the appropriate person or to a general employment address like "hiringmanager@anycompany.com." Here, caution is warranted. Be sure to send your resume and cover letter exactly as the hiring manager requests. Some employers prefer that the resume and cover letter be attached as separate documents (usually in a Text Only format or as Microsoft Word documents). Other employers want the cover letter to be in the body of an e-mail, but the resume to be attached separately. Still others prefer that both the resume and the cover letter be pasted into the body of an e-mail. For the latter, be sure that your documents are easy to read. Resumes, which have a rather complicated format, often look messy when they are transplanted into the body of an e-mail. Says recruiter Beth Camp: "If you e-mail a resume, it has to look as good as a written resume. I would advise sending a resume both as an attachment and in the body of your e-mail." This is a good way to sidestep a possible formatting fiasco. Another way is to send your resume and cover letter electronically, then to send hard copies as well.

Some Jobs, Task, Work, Career & Occupation
eekers opt to purchase domain names and to create their own Websites for the purpose of putting their resumes (and other application materials) online. The advantage of formatting your resume using HTML and making it a static Web page is that anyone can see your resume in its proper format simply by visiting your Website. Thus, instead of mailing or e-mailing your resume every time you want someone to see it, you can simply give the interested parties the right web address and they can find it for themselves. An added bonus of having your resume on a Web page is that you may attract the interest of recruiters and employers whom you hadn't even considered. To make downloading your resume easier, you may want to include on your Website copies of your resume in PDF (portable document format) and Microsoft Word files.

Unfortunately, there are downsides to putting your resume on a Website. One downside is that your information becomes accessible to everyone, even unwanted visitors. For this reason, you should never disclose your home address, social security number, or any other personal information. Another downside is that not all hiring managers will go out of their way to visit your Website. Even if your resume is only a click away, many hiring managers would nevertheless prefer that you mail or e-mail it.

In terms of how you send your application materials, it would be unwise to go against the explicit wishes of an employer. For example, don't send an attachment when copy-and-pasting is requested. Some companies shun attachments because they fear getting a virus, or because they don't have compatible software, or because they simply don't want to be bothered with the extra step of opening a document.

When assembling your application materials and putting them into an e-mail, don't fill in the "to" field until you are finished. It's all too easy to accidentally send a half-finished e-mail to a company, thus eliminating your chances of making a decent first impression, and most likely, of getting an interview. If you were asked to copy-and-paste your resume and cover letter, be sure to scan the final outcome at least once for formatting problems, then to use a spell checker a final time.

If you are attaching your documents, be absolutely sure you are attaching the right versions (i.e., the company-tailored and updated versions) to the employer. Also, be sure that they are labeled in a professional way. One Jobs, Task, Work, Career & Occupation
eeker laments his decision to save different versions of his resume under headings like "Resume for Strategic Sourcing Jobs, Task, Work, Career & Occupation
." Says the Jobs, Task, Work, Career & Occupation
eeker: "I was applying for three different types of positions. But I didn't want every prospective employer to know that. By labeling my outgoing resumes the way I did, I pretty much broadcasted the fact that I didn't have a clear career direction." Probably the best strategy for saving your resume is to do so under your name only (example: Simone Piette resume) or under your name and the name of the company (example: Greenfield resume from Simone Piette). Be sure to say in your e-mail what you have attached, and also, what software you've used. For example, you might say in the body of your e-mail: "Please see my attached resume in Microsoft Word version 2002."

Before a hiring manager even opens your e-mail, she should know exactly who you are and which job you are applying for. In the "Subject" line, write your name, the position name (and job number, if listed), and the contents of your application (example, "Simone Piette resume and cover letter for Executive Assistant Position").

If you've been referred to a position by another person, be sure to "cc" (carbon copy) or "bcc" (blind carbon copy) your reference when you apply. That is, add that person's e-mail to the "cc" or "bcc" field, which will enable that person to receive an exact copy of the e-mail you're sending to the hiring manager. The reason you want to "cc" or "bcc" your referrer is because you want to keep him in the loop. After all, if someone has offered to help you, he should know what stage you're at in the application process. (Note: Some e-mail programs don't offer "cc" or "bcc" fields, in which case you'll want to e-mail your reference separately.)

Finally, be sure to save a copy of your outgoing e-mail in your "Sent Mail" folder, just in case the e-mail doesn't go through and you need to send it again.




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