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Nursing, Care Taking, Fostering

 

Patient Rights Nursing, Care Taking, Fostering Assistants Need to be Aware of

Nursing, Care Taking, Fostering assistants take great care in providing patients with the best possible care. They assist with meeting their basic needs on whatever level that particular patient needs. Nursing, Care Taking, Fostering assistants often have to make informed decisions for the patients they care for. However, it is very important for all Nursing, Care Taking, Fostering Assistants to be aware of rights of all patients. Nursing, Care Taking, Fostering assistants need to familiarize themselves with these rights and respect them.

Patients have the right to be fully informed at the time of admission and throughout their stay in the facility. As the Nursing, Care Taking, Fostering Assistant, you may be asked questions by patients that you are not qualified to answer. Acknowledge this with the patient, let them know who can answer their question, and document the information in their chart. Most information given to patients and their family will come directly from the doctor or the charge Nurse.

All patients have the right to refuse treatment. This can be difficult for Nursing, Care Taking, Fostering Assistants as they really want to be as helpful to the patient as possible. However, if they do not want your assistance you can’t force them. You must report this to your supervisor as well as document the information in the patient’s chart.

If a patient is not happy with the care they are receiving, they have the right to inquire about grievance procedures and file a complaint. If a patient voices a complaint to you, provide them with the information to file a formal complaint. The policies and procedures for doing so will vary be medical facility.

Patients shall not encounter physical or mental abuse from anyone while staying in a medical facility. This includes chemical and physical restraints. Any such incidents shall be reported by the Nursing, Care Taking, Fostering Assistant immediately to the supervisor, and often the local police department.

It is the duty of all Nursing, Care Taking, Fostering Assistants to provide each patient with confidentiality and dignity. They should be treated with respect and privacy in regards to their personal information. Keeping anything you find out in the medical setting confined to other professionals who must know the situation is the best advice.

Patients have the right to participate in the religion of their choice. They are allowed to have visitors from the Church as well as private visitors as long as it does not interfere with medical advice. The Nursing, Care Taking, Fostering Assistant must learn to work the needs of the patient around such visits.

Providing quality care to individuals is a very rewarding challenge to Nursing, Care Taking, Fostering Assistants. Keep in mind that each patient has their own personality, desires, and needs. They want these to continue being met even while they are in a medical facility. This allows them to maintain a routine and sense of normalcy. The longer you care for a patient, the better you will understand how to best care for them.

It is difficult to balance the medical needs of a patient with their own personal desires. However, it is possible to provide both by respecting the patient’s rights. This will ensure that they understand and denied requests are done purely in the best interest of their well being. Nursing, Care Taking, Fostering Assistants are often considered an ally by patients. They help reduce any issues between the patient and Nursing, Care Taking, Fostering staff as well as the patient and physician.

 

Patient Rights Nursing, Care Taking, Fostering Assistants Need to be Aware of

Nursing, Care Taking, Fostering assistants take great care in providing patients with the best possible care. They assist with meeting their basic needs on whatever level that particular patient needs. Nursing, Care Taking, Fostering assistants often have to make informed decisions for the patients they care for. However, it is very important for all Nursing, Care Taking, Fostering Assistants to be aware of rights of all patients. Nursing, Care Taking, Fostering assistants need to familiarize themselves with these rights and respect them.

Patients have the right to be fully informed at the time of admission and throughout their stay in the facility. As the Nursing, Care Taking, Fostering Assistant, you may be asked questions by patients that you are not qualified to answer. Acknowledge this with the patient, let them know who can answer their question, and document the information in their chart. Most information given to patients and their family will come directly from the doctor or the charge Nurse.

All patients have the right to refuse treatment. This can be difficult for Nursing, Care Taking, Fostering Assistants as they really want to be as helpful to the patient as possible. However, if they do not want your assistance you can’t force them. You must report this to your supervisor as well as document the information in the patient’s chart.

If a patient is not happy with the care they are receiving, they have the right to inquire about grievance procedures and file a complaint. If a patient voices a complaint to you, provide them with the information to file a formal complaint. The policies and procedures for doing so will vary be medical facility.

Patients shall not encounter physical or mental abuse from anyone while staying in a medical facility. This includes chemical and physical restraints. Any such incidents shall be reported by the Nursing, Care Taking, Fostering Assistant immediately to the supervisor, and often the local police department.

It is the duty of all Nursing, Care Taking, Fostering Assistants to provide each patient with confidentiality and dignity. They should be treated with respect and privacy in regards to their personal information. Keeping anything you find out in the medical setting confined to other professionals who must know the situation is the best advice.

Patients have the right to participate in the religion of their choice. They are allowed to have visitors from the Church as well as private visitors as long as it does not interfere with medical advice. The Nursing, Care Taking, Fostering Assistant must learn to work the needs of the patient around such visits.

Providing quality care to individuals is a very rewarding challenge to Nursing, Care Taking, Fostering Assistants. Keep in mind that each patient has their own personality, desires, and needs. They want these to continue being met even while they are in a medical facility. This allows them to maintain a routine and sense of normalcy. The longer you care for a patient, the better you will understand how to best care for them.

It is difficult to balance the medical needs of a patient with their own personal desires. However, it is possible to provide both by respecting the patient’s rights. This will ensure that they understand and denied requests are done purely in the best interest of their well being. Nursing, Care Taking, Fostering Assistants are often considered an ally by patients. They help reduce any issues between the patient and Nursing, Care Taking, Fostering staff as well as the patient and physician.

 

Palliative Care : Nurses Speak Hope When Hope Seems Lost

Dealing with the loss of a loved one. How nurses relieve tension in the home.

palliative care, Nursing, Care Taking, Fostering, health, medicine

Any Family dealing with the loss of a loved one is usually involved in the Medical Community. The ones wit the most frequent and closest care are the nurses. The nurse is there working closely with the client assess their needs as well as the families needs. Family and dear friends are coping with the many physical and emotional demands of the dying or palliative patient. It is a heavy burden to bear and bearing it can cause a deep feeling of hopelessness that blurs all vision of hope for help and improving the situation for both the Patient and the Family.

A Nurse is a listening ear and not only for the client but for the family. There are a lot of fears that can be put to rest when they are voiced and appropriate and helpful solutions are presented. A nurse is A Client Advocate who will speak up and seek out help that the client or family may not know how to or be unable to themselves.

When many fears have been put to rest by being able to talk them out with the Nurse and Other members of the Palliative team then the client and family will have a better sense of being in control of the process a little better and are then able to make healthier and more beneficial decisions for their care.

A Client who is unable to speak for themselves is often spoken for by the family member. They may not be reading the signs that the patient may be giving non-verbally.The Nurse can come along side the Family member and help them become more aware of how to assess the needs and manage comfort levels in a safe and healthy way.

Speaking the truth in kindness is a difficult thing to do. But as the Patient is priority the nurse takes this responsibility and does her best to respectfully bring to awareness the needs. She helps set up a Plan with the Doctors, Case managers and many other valued members of the health team.

Often a Spouse will try to take a lot of the load on themselves and they often get burnt out and put themselves at risk of physical and emotional exhaustion. There are many Palliative resources that can alleviate the stress and help improve both client and Family members safety. For example and older woman trying to help her palliative husband to the bathroom is unable to support him if he would fall and the risk of them both ending up with a detrimental injury is high! The care giver in this case the wife would be of no further help if she ended up in hospital with a broken hip for example. This can be avoided with getting a helper in for transferring the client or for daily care like getting bathed etc.

Helping the Client and Family become aware of the help they can get and being positive with them as much as possible Speaks Hope were things seem Hopeless!
It Is always good to talk and ask as many questions as you need to. You can only get more information to help relieve your overwhelmed feelings if You are in this situation.




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