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Parenting, Caring, Procreate

 

This Year, Let Your Children Fail in School

Throwing a safety net under a kid is tantamount to slinging a noose around his neck. Everyone wants kids to succeed. All adults want children to become responsible, independent learners who grow to make wise decisions. So why do adults get in the way of kids’ success? It’s done every day–adults rescuing kids from certain [...]

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Throwing a safety net under a kid is tantamount to slinging a noose around his neck. Everyone wants kids to succeed. All adults want children to become responsible, independent learners who grow to make wise decisions. So why do adults get in the way of kids’ success? It’s done every day–adults rescuing kids from certain failure.

See if this scenario is familiar. Alan, 9, has known since October 1 that his book report is due by the end of the month. Mom sees at the end of the second week, Alan hasn’t even started. “Alan, you’re going to read the next 20 pages for your book report. I mapped out how many pages you have to read every day to still have time to write the report, but you’ll only make it if you keep to my schedule. Now get started.” He trudges upstairs and begins to read, but puts the book aside to play a video game. He repeats this pattern for the next week and a half. On October 30, he suddenly realizes his report is due!

“Mom,” he cries in panic, “I’m not done with my book report! I’ve read most of it, but I haven’t gotten to the ending, and I still have to write the report! It’s due tomorrow! What am I going to do?” He’s crying remorsefully and he sincerely feels bad about the impending poor grade.

Mom devises a plan. She’ll read the last two chapters of the book while Alan begins writing the summary. By the time he’s written as far as he can, she’ll have read the ending and can tell Alan what happens.

Alan’s learned a lot, but not necessarily the lessons intended. He’s discovered that Mom will get him out of a jam he created for himself and that the ultimate grade counts more to Mom than how he earns it. He has notlearned taking responsibility for his grades or how to accomplish a longterm task. He doesn’t have to organize his time or stick to a project, because if he messes up, Mom will take care of it.

This scenario could be much different. At the beginning of the month, Mom could ask Alan to set up a calendar, showing what pages he’ll read by what dates, leaving time for the actual report before the due date. If Alan is on schedule, she can build his self-praising skills by noting, “It looks like you’re sticking to your plan. How’s that feel?”

If Alan goofs off for two weeks, Mom can ask...(read the full article at the link below)

 

Unhealthy Air in Schools: Building Materials Play a Role

Many children are being subjected to indoor air quality problems in their schools.

Unhealthy Air in Schools: Building Materials Play a Role

Many children are being subjected to indoor air quality problems in their schools.

Oftentimes, these problems can be attributed to the materials used in constructing the schools, many of which provide a food source for mold.

Even with the best building design, moisture likely will be present in all schools at some point, so the choice in building materials is critical to reducing or eliminating the amount of damage caused by mold.

A new video produced by the National Concrete Masonry Association titled "Building Smarter Schools: Are You Making an Educated Investment?" calls attention to the issue of mold in school buildings and its cost to communities.

"In our area of Texas, there is an 18-month-old school that is abandoned and full of mold," said Chris Huckabee, chief executive officer of the architecture firm Huckabee & Associates and a frequent lecturer on high-performance school design. "This is obviously not popular with the taxpayers or the school administrators."

The video showcases schools across North America in which masonry construction was the solution to serious mold problems. Huckabee notes that all of the schools that his company has built -more than 1,000 - were built with masonry because mold will not damage it.

"Schools are landmarks in the community and we want them to stand the test of time," said Huckabee, who is featured in the video, along with school architects, a school superintendent and a facilities director for a large school division. All favor the use of concrete masonry in school construction because it is resistant to mold, wind and fire, durable, energy-efficient and easy to maintain.

 

Research Shows Need Exists For After-School Program

Every day, more than 14 million children in the U.S. are left unsupervised after school. According to experts, that leaves them in danger of becoming victims or perpetrators of crime or delinquent behavior.

Research Shows Need Exists For After-School Program

Every day, more than 14 million children in the U.S. are left unsupervised after school. According to experts, that leaves them in danger of becoming victims or perpetrators of crime or delinquent behavior.

In fact, a recently released survey supports the need for quality after-school programs that offer students homework assistance and academic goal-setting to help deter kids from crime and substance abuse.

Television is the No. 1 homework distraction, according to the Boys & Girls Clubs of America/JCPenney Afterschool Fund Survey, which questioned students about homework and on graduating from high school. Sixty-seven percent of students said teachers should assign homework, but 54 percent claim there is too much of it.

Also, most of the students surveyed said graduating high school was very important to them, with 61 percent saying going to college was their primary ambition after high school. The negative influence of peers was cited as the greatest challenge to finishing high school.

To address these statistics, Boys & Girls Clubs of America and the JCPenney Afterschool Fund have partnered to create after-school programs that, according to Julie Berkhouse, after-school specialist for the JCPenney Afterschool Fund, emphasize the importance of doing well in school and planning for the future.

"Numerous studies have shown that children involved in quality after-school programs, including those that offer homework assistance, have better grades, higher school attendance, better attitudes toward school, higher educational aspirations and less need for disciplinary action," said Berkhouse.

One such program is Power Hour. This interactive homework assistance program helps young people view homework as an opportunity to learn how to work independently, successfully complete a project on time and feel good about their accomplishments.

Additionally, Goals for Graduation is a program for youth ages 6 to 15 that provides one-on-one activities to support academic goal-setting, learning and success in school. Through an incremental approach, students create an action plan with daily and weekly goals - leading to both short- and long-term gains.

"Research shows that without significant educational support, many young people are likely to accept low standards of academic achievement, leading to unrealized potential and locking them into limited opportunities for employment and life," said Carrie Prudente, director of education programs for Boys & Girls Clubs of America.




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