godaddy
Home Articles Blog Updates Subjects Topics Tips & Guides New Contact Us
adblock creatives to be added later Loose weight without medicines, step by step

Improve your sex life -- overcome your frustration

Survive in Bed Click Here!

Increase your breast size by 2 cups, naturally and without surgery Click Here!
This Single Mother Makes Over $700 per Week Helping Businesses With Their Facebook and Twitter Accounts. You too can earn extra money. Click Here!

Earn money with simple online job works. Click Here!

Discounts at Amazon.com
Eliminate your diabetes, we can help you destroy your diabetes

Self improvement and motivational guru gives simple tips to success - must listen

A foolproof, science based diet that will reduce your weight by 12 to 23 pound Click Here!

Blog

Parenting, Caring, Procreate

 

How To Read So Your Children Will Fall In Love with Books

If you want to ignite the love of reading in your child, you have to do more than just read the words page after page, book after book. How you read and what you do during the reading determines how much your child gets out of that reading time. So, how do you read so your children will fall in love with books?

Children, reading, books

If you want to ignite the love of reading in your child, you have to do more than just read the words page after page, book after book. How you read and what you do during the reading determines how much your child gets out of that reading time. So, how do you read so your children will fall in love with books? Here are some suggestions:

1. <b>Engage children in the story whenever opportunity permits.</b> For example, have them join in the chants and rhymes, say repetitive phrases, or fill in the last words. Some stories allow for some acting along such as roaring like a lion or mewing like a cat. Show children that with books they can be active participants rather than just passive listeners.

2. <b>Read with expression.</b> You can use different voices for different characters. Also vary the way you read: loud, soft, sadly, happily, excitedly, scarily etc... according to the text. Let your voice and face bring out the emotions of the words. Spark their imagination by making the story come alive for them.

3. <b>Ask questions.</b> There are several types of questions you could ask:
<ul>
<li>To bring their attention to certain details. For example, "Can you see where the Big Bad Wolf is hiding?"</li>
<li>To increase comprehension. For example, "Why do you think the Little Red Hen didn't want to share the bread she had made?" </li>
<li>To have them predict what might happen. These questions also irks their curiosity. For example, ask "What do you think will happen next?"</li>
</ul>
Just be careful you don't turn the reading session into a quiz session. Also, don't ask too many questions or it will disrupt the flow of the story.

4. Enrich the reading with <b>follow up activities and discussion.</b> Think of craft ideas or songs that relate to the story. For example, after reading Eric Carle's The Very Hungry Caterpillar, you could do a butterfly craft or sing a song about the days of the week. It could be as simple as having your child draw his favorite character or favorite part of the story. How about identifying new words to expand vocabulary. Another idea would be to talk about similar experiences your child may have had. For example, if the story was about going to the doctors, you could remind your child about the time he went to the doctors. Discuss your child's feelings and views about the story or illustration.

To get more out of a book, here are some finer points to remember:

1. <b>Allow children to handle the book</b> by encouraging them to help turn the pages. Don't be afraid to let them explore the book on their own before or after you've read the story. They may not know how to read yet but they can still enjoy the illustrations. And if they know the story well enough, you might catch them pretending to read, just like you.

2. If you are reading to toddlers, don't forget to <b>introduce them to the make up of the book.</b> Don't only read the title of the book but also read the name of the author and illustrator. Show them which is the front of the book, which is the back and where to start reading. Point to the words as you read so they know that reading is done from left to right, and from top to bottom of the page. Of course, all these are absorbed better when done in fun and silliness. For example, attempt to read a book upside down and your child will only be too eager to correct you.

3. <b>Don't rush through the book.</b> Read slowly and clearly. Create a relaxed atmosphere, free from stress and anxiety. Just for that few moments, free your mind from the 101 chores you have waiting for you.

So, if you want your child to love reading, show them first how enjoyable books can be. Opening book after book and just monotonously reading the words therein will not do much for your child. To get the most out of a book, you need to engage them and draw them into the story. If you can do this, you will heighten your child's love for books and reading.

 

Help Youngsters Develop Their Love Of Reading

The word is out--parents can help their little ones learn to read and like it, if they heed a few hints.

Help Youngsters Develop Their Love Of Reading

The word is out-parents can help their little ones learn to read and like it, if they heed a few hints:

&#8226; Show them you like to read. Point out articles of interest to kids in this publication or others you may have. Let them see you read books for pleasure.

&#8226; Read aloud to your children long before they understand what you're saying. Point to the words on the page as you say them. Follow the sentence with your finger so that children begin to recognize how words appear on the page. When they can read a little themselves, read together. Begin by reading in unison. Then, read alternate pages or paragraphs.

&#8226; When shopping, cooking or riding in the car, show them how useful reading can be. Let them read lists or recipes or road signs to you.

&#8226; It may come as a surprise to some, but parents could encourage their youngsters to read more if they sat down with them and watched more DVDs.

Not just any DVDs, though. Start with those that are not only based on popular and classic children's books, but that engage the youngster's interest and perhaps teach a few useful life lessons along the way.

One DVD in the increasingly trendy genre of children's fantasy involves an unlikely band of friends in the adventure of a lifetime. Called "The Thief Lord," this modern-day fairy tale in the spellbinding tradition of the Harry Potter series brings to life the beloved characters from the acclaimed novel by The New York Times best-selling author Cornelia Funke ("Dragon Rider," "Inkspell"). It features a remarkable cast including academy award-winner Vanessa Redgrave, Jim Carter, Caroline Goodall and a talented young cast of newcomers.

This fun-filled family adventure tells the story of two boys who escape from a mean aunt to the city of Venice where they encounter The Thief Lord and his gang of ragamuffin child runaways, leading to an adventure that will leave them all changed forever. Children who watch it can further develop their own sense of empowerment and independence.

Funke's book was honored with the Book Sense Book of the Year Award from the American Booksellers Association among several other prizes. An internationally renowned children's author, Funke has written over 40 books.

 

Children Can Keep Learning While On Vacation

The phrase "use it or lose it" may describe the way many students deal with new information. Experts say that within 24 to 48 hours after learning new concepts, students often begin to forget information.

Children Can Keep Learning While On Vacation

The phrase "use it or lose it" may describe the way many students deal with new information. Experts say that within 24 to 48 hours after learning new concepts, students often begin to forget information.

Although a vacation from school is great for recharging your children's batteries, it can often offset the learning process.

The good news is that it may be easier than you think to reinforce learning activities. According to Dr. Richard E. Bavaria, Ph.D. and vice president of Sylvan Learning Center, "School breaks are an important time for parents to share in everyday learning activities with their children to enhance math, reading, writing and study skills development."

The following tips are fun ways to help your child continue to learn while away from school:

&#8226; Attend academic camps. To make the most of school breaks, look for camps that provide an academic focus. Programs should offer a broad selection of courses built to suit individual needs while targeting specific subjects and offering a small group environment. Look for programs with experience teaching children the same age as your child and flexibility in scheduling.

&#8226; Write a story. Encourage your child to keep a daily journal or write letters to family members to communicate weekly highlights. Encourage your child to read his or her writings aloud.

&#8226; Create a budget. Ask your child to assist in the creation of a grocery budget. This will help develop math skills and allow children to plan for "extras" that they might want during their break.

&#8226; Play a game. Board games and puzzles are not only fun, but encourage the development of analysis and logic skills. Play together as a family to double the fun.

&#8226; Take a trip to the library. Local libraries offer resources for families and many offer free children's programs and clubs. Librarians can also help parents find books that are appropriate for your child's reading level.

&#8226; Explore the Internet. There are many sites that provide educational enrichment for children and can motivate students to study more often and for longer periods of time. For instance, visit www.bookadventure.org to create personalized book lists from more than 7,000 recommended titles.

godaddy

godaddy
children parenting tips challenges
children parent parenting advice
children puppets muppets
children reading books
children reading comprehension predicting
children's birthday gifts games
children school safety
children stealing deployment
children toy neat room
child's adhd symptoms diet
child safe online keylogger software
child safety identification
child safety protection services
child target for internet predators
christan drugs alcohol dating
classic toys kids party games
cloth diapers children potty training
college education exams learning
common childhood illnesses cold
communicating with teens
conflict resolution for children
constipation bloating diaper runaways teen
court determines child joint custody
create indelible bond unconditional love
create personal instruction manual for life
daycare school children safety tips
development family parent love child
diet food exercise fitness health
discipline punishment parenting technique
discovering new thing family time children’s conscience
dna paternity testing about my father
ecstacy teens cocaine drug
educational videos game child’s development
education doubt fear child parenting
education program child learning
education school teacher student
evenflo graco high chairs guide
exercise induced asthma childs fears anxieties
family business right for you
family challenge acknowledging emotion
fear anxiety autism children
find nanny jobs agencies services
find toy hobby creativities
first time winning grandparents
fitness empty nest syndrome kids quiet
four parenting styles
frustrations rewards of parenting teenagers promote independence
games for children meta patterns genius
getting help for troubled teens
grocery shopping illogical use of logic
guilt parenting family children
hand eye coordination child reader
hearts hands valentine
helping children adjust to stepfamily
helping your child stay fit healthy
help your child learn to read
introducing children to music
is posting children's pictures online dangerous
is your baby’s size normal
parenting family children advice discipline
parenting family child safety
parenting family parties children game
survey about injury risks
take picture prevent obesity
bad credit personal loans
bad funny way save money
godaddy
godaddy