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Parenting, Caring, Procreate

 

7 Safety Tips For School Kids

Travelling to and from school is often not very safe. This article outlines some simple rules that can help to make the school journeys safer, ensuring peace of mind for both children and parents.

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Travelling to and from school is often not very safe. However, there are some simple rules that can help to make the school journeys safer, ensuring peace of mind for both children and parents.

1. Waiting for the school bus in the mornings, while traffic is at it busiest, requires a degree of commonsense. Try to have a safe place for children to wait at away from the street and heavy traffic.

2. Don’t let children move close to the school bus until it has come to a complete stop and the driver has signalled that it is safe to board.

3. At the end of the school day when children leave the bus, instruct your child to move away from the vehicle at least a dozen large strides to a point where the driver can clearly see them. This helps the driver and keeps the child safe as well.

4. Instruct your child to keep a close eye on all traffic near to the school bus. The law has some special protection measures for school buses, but car drivers are only human, and they can and often do make mistakes.

5. If your child walks to school, make sure he or she wears reflective material. Aim to make them as visible to as possible to all drivers. This will help to avoid accidents.

6. If a child rides a bike to school, instruct them to walk the bike through intersections, observe all traffic light signals, and be wearing reflective material. They should also be with a friend if possible as one can help to look out for the other.

7. If you take your own child to school in your car, always have older children in a seat with a safety belt on, younger children in a booster seat with a safety belt on, and very small children in special safety seats, all seated in the back with only you, the driver, in the front.

 

How Fire-Safe Is Your School?

Gail Minger wishes she had asked more questions about fire safety at her son's school before she sent him off to college. In 1998, Michael Minger, a sophomore, died in a residence hall fire at Murray State University in Kentucky.

How Fire-Safe Is Your School?

Gail Minger wishes she had asked more questions about fire safety at her son's school before she sent him off to college. In 1998, Michael Minger, a sophomore, died in a residence hall fire at Murray State University in Kentucky.

"When we visited the campus, we just assumed the residence hall was safe, just like most parents do," she said. "We assumed it had sprinklers. After the fire, we learned that the residence hall had been written up by the fire marshal's office two years in a row for not having sprinklers, as well as for other safety code violations."

Since January 2000, 75 people have died in fires in student housing, according to the Center for Campus Fire Safety, a nonprofit organization that works to improve fire safety on college campuses. Parents may not realize that many residence halls do not have automatic sprinklers.

"Everyone remembers to ask about Internet capabilities and crime statistics at colleges, but too often we forget about fire safety," said Ed Comeau, director for the Center for Campus Fire Safety. "The truth is that someone who travels is safer than students living in residence halls because many hotels across the nation have automatic fire sprinkler systems and state-of-the-art fire alarm systems. Students should have the same level of safety."

"Student living means rooms full of books, paper, bedding, curtains, and clothes - and lots of potential fire hazards in a very small area," said John Drengenberg, manager of consumer affairs at Underwriters Laboratories, a nonprofit organization that tests products for safety. "In this situation, even the smallest spark can be deadly."

Schools are not required to make campus fire safety information available to the public, Comeau said. He recommends that parents ask the following questions during campus tours:

* How many fires have occurred on campus in the past five years and how many students have been injured or killed?

* Are residence halls equipped with an automatic fire sprinkler system in each room?

* Does every student's room have a smoke alarm that sends a signal to campus security or the fire department?

* Does the school investigate the alarms before notifying the fire department? This will delay the arrival of the fire department when there is a fire. The fire department should automatically be notified of all alarms.

* Are candles, halogen lamps and smoking prohibited?

* Does the school have policies that require electrical appliances and power strips to be certified as safe and reliable?

* How much fire prevention training does the residence hall staff receive and who provides it?

* What is the school's disciplinary policy toward students who cause false alarms or fail to evacuate?

* Does the school provide fire extinguisher training for students?

 

How To Prevent Your Child From Having Problems At Daycare Or School

Let’s face it: As a parent or guardian, your child means everything to you. When putting your child through daycare or school, it is important to make sure that nothing goes wrong to harm your child – either physically or mentally.

Additionally, your child’s health and safety should be one of your top concerns. If your child is enrolled in a day care or school program and something goes wrong, you’re sure to feel upset or angry.

However, taking an aggressive approach an...

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Let’s face it: As a parent or guardian, your child means everything to you. When putting your child through daycare or school, it is important to make sure that nothing goes wrong to harm your child – either physically or mentally.

Additionally, your child’s health and safety should be one of your top concerns. If your child is enrolled in a day care or school program and something goes wrong, you’re sure to feel upset or angry.

However, taking an aggressive approach and complaining with the daycare or school can sometimes make the problem worse rather than better. Rather, you should take preventative measures to making sure that your child will have a wonderful experience.

Below are some proven steps you can follow to making sure that your child doesn’t run into any serious problem at daycare or school:

- Do not blame anyone before having solid proof or evidence. Work with your child’s teacher or caregiver on coming up with several solutions to the problem and reaffirm your active role in your child’s education. By being a problem-solver, you’re not only showing that you’re active and involved in your child’s life, but also that you’re a responsible individual who cares about coming up with solutions rather than winning arguments.

- Use subtlety when trying to probe the truth from teachers or caretakers. Try to find something worth praising or noting in the school or person who is working with your child. Starting the conversation out on a positive note shows that not only are you concerned about your child’s well being, but that you also notice and appreciate the dedication and enthusiasm of the caregivers and teachers involved.

- Let your child tell you in his or her own words what’s going on at daycare or school. However, you shouldn’t rely on their explanation as the only one. Get information from teachers, classmates or even other parents. You’ll find that there are several sides to the story, and the more you know, the more fully and accurately you can approach the teacher or caretaker and voice your concerns.

- Follow up with the people you’ve taken your complaints to and talk with your child to see how things have improved. If the situation hasn’t changed, take your complaint to the next person up and repeat the steps above until a resolution has been made. Being informed and involved with your child’s school shows that you’re more interested in seeing quality results than making a one-time complaint and letting the issue sit while nothing is done to correct it.

- Try to keep the issue on the actual incident instead of the people involved. This helps minimize any later confrontations (between your child and another child, for example), and also helps the teacher focus on the problem and not the ones who started it. Also, don’t forget or ignore your child’s possible role in the problem.

As they say, it is best to prevent than to find a cure later. Always be sure to show your confidence in the daycare or school you enroll your child in. This way the daycare or school will also respond by living up to your expectations!

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