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Small Business

 

Solo-professionals! Where's your road map to success?

As an accounting manager struggling to build my coaching business online and after many years of struggle, I now focus on 9 FABULOUS concepts that have multiplied my business exponentially:

Figure out what you want.
Activate your creative juices
Brand yourself.
Understand basic net and web strategies (HTML)
Lead a Championship Support Team
Over deliver, over respond, WOW your clients
Use the Universal Laws
Spring into action
Spend wisely: invest in your business and yourself

attract business, find clients, find customers, how to get more business, discussion group, law of attraction, attract clients, solo-profesionals, internet clients, David Wood,,coachville, marketing,

As an accounting manager struggling to build my coaching business online and after many years of struggle, I now focus on 9 FABULOUS concepts that have multiplied my business exponentially.

1. Figure out where you want to be in 3 years.

Having a vision for your business is so important that it could make our break you. Not knowing where you want to be spells disaster with a capital “D”!

Creating a powerful vision for where you want to be in 3 years, 1 year and in 30 days in your business helps you to remain focused on what is important.

2. Activate your creative juices and tell your story

Prospects have to trust you-plain and simple-before they will do business with you and purchase your services and your products. The quickest and easiest way to do this is to tell your story.

Tell us if you understand our problems and how you can help us. Let us know if you’ve been in our situation before and how you dealt with it. Share with us your problems and how you overcame them.

3. Brand yourself-Determine what differentiates you.

There are thousands and thousands of solo-professionals around the world each possibly giving the same information. Why should someone give you their business? What is different about your business?

A significant factor to attracting your ideal clients is telling them why you are dissimilar from the others and unique in what you teach. As a solo-professional, you are your brand. What can you offer your clients that makes you different, diverse and special?

4. Understand basic net and web strategies

As an aspiring solo-professional I believe it is imperative that you know basic web language and strategies. Who wants to call up your web designer every time you want to make a slight page to a web page?

For those just starting out in their businesses, you’ve got to know how to reach your prospects through email newsletters and you’ve got to know how to record a tele-seminar. These could be doubly vital if you’re on a budget.

5. Lead a Championship Support Team

Whether you’re a solo-professional like a coach, consultant or otherwise, you need to recognize the importance of having team beside you. A team could propel your business to profitability faster than anything I know. Adding even a part-time virtual assistant (VA) to your team can do wonders.

I can hear you saying now “I can’t afford it!” Well you think you can’t, but how about bartering with a VA. You offer your services to her and vice versa. Easy, huh?

6. Over deliver, over respond, WOW your clients

I’m passionate about this concept. Once you’ve gotten a client, keep ‘em! Seduce them over and over to become a walking referral for you.

Offering your clients fabulous service and unexpected add-ons, gifts and responses will leave them saying only one thing about your and your business - “Wow!”

7. Use the Universal Laws to effortlessly attract your ideal clients

What are you focusing on each day in your business? No clients? Too much to do? Not enough time? Well, believe it or not, you create your reality!
You are where you are in your business by what you have been thinking and focusing on yesterday, last week and last year.

I use the Law of Attraction in my life coaching business and it’s a powerful ‘tool’ for solo-professionals to use in their businesses as well. By setting your intention at each step of the way, building your business becomes as easy and effortless as you can ever imagine.

8. Spring into action-create S.M.A.R.T goals

Do you have a plan for your business? Have you decided what you will be doing this month, this quarter or this year to grow your business?

Having a calendar for marketing and growing your business is vital to achieving your goals. We all know that our goals should be specific, measurable, action-oriented, realistic and timely, don’t we?

9. Spend wisely: invest in your business and yourself

When I first started in my business, I spent wildly and uncontrollably to get my business up and running fast. This was the biggest mistake of my life! I had to turn that mindset around and quit cold-turkey.

Concentrating on forecasting and reinvesting a percentage of your profits into your business is critical to making it. It’s also important to invest in yourself as you grow personally and professional. You’re bank account will only grow as fast as You grow.

These 9 concepts are the building blocks of attracting clients from the ‘net for solo-professionals and will make you more money in less time. Try them for a month and you’ll be amazed.

 

Cash Flow Planning for Solo Professionals

Lack of cash flow planning is the reason why many businesses fail. In fact, many PROFITABLE businesses fail because of cash flow issues. Without adequate cash flow, you can’t pay your bills and you can’t make plans for your business.

Cash flow planning, budgeting, small business, solo professional, solo entrepreneur, financial planning

You’ve heard it a million times – cash flow can make or break a business. Lack of cash flow planning is the reason why many businesses fail. In fact, many PROFITABLE businesses fail because of cash flow issues. Without adequate cash flow, you can’t pay your bills and you can’t make plans for your business.

So… what is cash flow planning? Cash flow planning is projecting your future cash inflows from sales, services, and loans, and comparing them to your future cash flow needs (suppliers, salaries/wages, loan payments, taxes, etc.). The difference between the two is your net cash flow.

Why is cash flow planning so important? Cash flow planning can help you identify problems down the road, and fix them before they occur. Cash flow planning can also help you make decisions such as should I attend that conference I’ve wanted to attend, should I buy the new computer I’ve been wanting, or do I need to work extra hard this month to avoid a cash flow deficiency next month?

The first step in planning your cash flow is knowing where you spend your money! Solo entrepreneurs need to have a good grip on both their personal and business spending, as most solo entrepreneurs rely on their business income to meet personal finance goals (i.e., pay the bills!). So, you should track both your personal and your business spending, although I recommend that you keep them separate (that’s a topic all by itself).

What’s the best way to track your spending? You can use pen & paper, spreadsheets or a software program. The best method for you is the method that you will actually use on a regular basis.

You should project your spending for at least the next 12 months so that you include annual and other periodic expenses. If you are experiencing a cash flow crisis, you should track & project your cash flow on a weekly basis, instead of monthly.

If you are an existing business, you can project your cash flow for the next year by reviewing your expenses for last year. If you are a new business, you will need to estimate your start up costs in addition to regular operating expenses.

Start up costs include inventory, legal expenses, advertising, licenses & permits, supplies, and many more costs that you may not have thought of. To research startup costs you should contact your local Small Business Development Center, contact a SCORE counselor, join groups of similar business owners, and read as many books or articles you can find on the subject.

To improve your cash flow, you should:

1. Complete the first 3 steps. You have to understand cash flow planning, track your cash flow, and project your future spending needs before you can improve your cash flow.

2. Create best and worst case scenarios and create appropriate responses to both scenarios. For example, if your best case scenario is to increase sales by 50%, how will you use the profits? Will you put the profits back into the company by investing in new equipment, training, etc.? If your worst case scenario is a drop in sales by 50%, how will you continue to cover your monthly expenses? By planning for the best and worst case scenarios, you’ll be ready for any situation.

3. When estimating your future income, realize that some people will pay late, and account for that fact in your projection.

4. Charge what you’re worth. Many businesses, especially service professionals, under-charge when they are first starting out. This is a great way to go out of business. Make sure you are charging what you’re worth, and remember you’re in business to make money, not to give your expertise away for free.

5. Watch your business spending. Focus on the value the item brings to your business, and avoid lavish spending (i.e., do you really need the fastest, newest computer available?).

6. Don’t hire until necessary. Consider using virtual assistants or temporary employees before hiring permanent employees.

7. Give incentives for early payment for products and services. On the flip side, chase down invoices the minute they’re late. Charge interest or late fees to encourage timely payments.

8. Update your cash flow regularly. Your cash flow plan will change frequently as your business grows. You may want to update your cash flow plan weekly when you first get started, then switch to monthly once you’ve got a good handle on your cash flow.

Remember - whether you are a new or growing business, your cash flow projection can make the difference between success and failure.

 

Cash Flow Planning for Solo Professionals

Lack of cash flow planning is the reason why many businesses fail. In fact, many PROFITABLE businesses fail because of cash flow issues. Without adequate cash flow, you can’t pay your bills and you can’t make plans for your business.

Cash flow planning, budgeting, small business, solo professional, solo entrepreneur, financial planning

You’ve heard it a million times – cash flow can make or break a business. Lack of cash flow planning is the reason why many businesses fail. In fact, many PROFITABLE businesses fail because of cash flow issues. Without adequate cash flow, you can’t pay your bills and you can’t make plans for your business.

So… what is cash flow planning? Cash flow planning is projecting your future cash inflows from sales, services, and loans, and comparing them to your future cash flow needs (suppliers, salaries/wages, loan payments, taxes, etc.). The difference between the two is your net cash flow.

Why is cash flow planning so important? Cash flow planning can help you identify problems down the road, and fix them before they occur. Cash flow planning can also help you make decisions such as should I attend that conference I’ve wanted to attend, should I buy the new computer I’ve been wanting, or do I need to work extra hard this month to avoid a cash flow deficiency next month?

The first step in planning your cash flow is knowing where you spend your money! Solo entrepreneurs need to have a good grip on both their personal and business spending, as most solo entrepreneurs rely on their business income to meet personal finance goals (i.e., pay the bills!). So, you should track both your personal and your business spending, although I recommend that you keep them separate (that’s a topic all by itself).

What’s the best way to track your spending? You can use pen & paper, spreadsheets or a software program. The best method for you is the method that you will actually use on a regular basis.

You should project your spending for at least the next 12 months so that you include annual and other periodic expenses. If you are experiencing a cash flow crisis, you should track & project your cash flow on a weekly basis, instead of monthly.

If you are an existing business, you can project your cash flow for the next year by reviewing your expenses for last year. If you are a new business, you will need to estimate your start up costs in addition to regular operating expenses.

Start up costs include inventory, legal expenses, advertising, licenses & permits, supplies, and many more costs that you may not have thought of. To research startup costs you should contact your local Small Business Development Center, contact a SCORE counselor, join groups of similar business owners, and read as many books or articles you can find on the subject.

To improve your cash flow, you should:

1. Complete the first 3 steps. You have to understand cash flow planning, track your cash flow, and project your future spending needs before you can improve your cash flow.

2. Create best and worst case scenarios and create appropriate responses to both scenarios. For example, if your best case scenario is to increase sales by 50%, how will you use the profits? Will you put the profits back into the company by investing in new equipment, training, etc.? If your worst case scenario is a drop in sales by 50%, how will you continue to cover your monthly expenses? By planning for the best and worst case scenarios, you’ll be ready for any situation.

3. When estimating your future income, realize that some people will pay late, and account for that fact in your projection.

4. Charge what you’re worth. Many businesses, especially service professionals, under-charge when they are first starting out. This is a great way to go out of business. Make sure you are charging what you’re worth, and remember you’re in business to make money, not to give your expertise away for free.

5. Watch your business spending. Focus on the value the item brings to your business, and avoid lavish spending (i.e., do you really need the fastest, newest computer available?).

6. Don’t hire until necessary. Consider using virtual assistants or temporary employees before hiring permanent employees.

7. Give incentives for early payment for products and services. On the flip side, chase down invoices the minute they’re late. Charge interest or late fees to encourage timely payments.

8. Update your cash flow regularly. Your cash flow plan will change frequently as your business grows. You may want to update your cash flow plan weekly when you first get started, then switch to monthly once you’ve got a good handle on your cash flow.

Remember - whether you are a new or growing business, your cash flow projection can make the difference between success and failure.




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