Home Articles Blog Updates Subjects Topics Tips & Guides New Contact Us
adblock creatives to be added later Loose weight without medicines, step by step

Improve your sex life -- overcome your frustration

Survive in Bed Click Here!

Increase your breast size by 2 cups, naturally and without surgery Click Here!
This Single Mother Makes Over $700 per Week Helping Businesses With Their Facebook and Twitter Accounts. You too can earn extra money. Click Here!

Earn money with simple online job works. Click Here!

Discounts at Amazon.com

Eliminate your diabetes, we can help you destroy your diabetes

Self improvement and motivational guru gives simple tips to success - must listen

A foolproof, science based diet that will reduce your weight by 12 to 23 pound Click Here!

Blog

Holiday, Vacation & Tour

 

Hello From Ottawa: Getting In Touch With Farming At The Canadian Agriculture Museum

After my very interesting introduction to sheep shearing and all sorts of wool processing techniques I had a chance to link up with David Sutin who is the Communications, Marketing and Farm Operations Manager for the Canada Agriculture Museum. In fact, Ottawa is the only world capital that has a working farm at its heart. David volunteered to give me a personal tour through the various facilities of the Museum and we started with the Dairy Barn. Right when you come in is an a...

Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, sheep, wool, artis, museum, agriculture, farm. farming

After my very interesting introduction to sheep shearing and all sorts of wool processing techniques I had a chance to link up with David Sutin who is the Communications, Marketing and Farm Operations Manager for the Canada Agriculture Museum. In fact, Ottawa is the only world capital that has a working farm at its heart. David volunteered to give me a personal tour through the various facilities of the Museum and we started with the Dairy Barn. Right when you come in is an area for the "dry cows": these are pregnant animals that stop giving milk in the two months before giving birth. David explained to me that the gestation period of cows is very similar to that of humans: 9 months.

David elaborated that male calves get moved into the sale barn and sadly enough, eventually they end up being processed into veal. On the other hand, the Museum keeps the female calves so they can grow up into milk cows. The Canada Agriculture Museum is home to a variety of different dairy cattle breeds and the most productive of them all are Holsteins. Jersey cows were imported from islands in the British Channel and I was just amazed at the beautiful faces and the huge, long-lashed eyes of these cows. The Canadienne cows were brought over from Europe by immigrants from France since they are hardier and better able to withstand the harsh Canadian winters although they are not highly efficient milk producers.

Every day the herdspersons at the Museum milk the cows at 6 am and 3:45 pm. The electric milking machines are connected to an overhead pipe system that leads into a 2500 liter storage tank where all the milk from the cows is collected and cooled to a temperature of 0 to 5 degrees Celsius. The milk is agitated for even cooling. Each cow actually drinks a bathtub of water everyday and produces 30 liters of milk. The milk of the cows is picked up every couple of days by the milk truck. David explained when a cow is sick and receiving antibiotic treatment, the milk is not allowed to be collected and actually gets washed down the drain.

We then continued into the maternity area that is also used for isolating sick animals. David mentioned that occasionally cows will suffer from a "twisted flipped stomach" (a cow's stomach actually consists of 4 separate parts) and this condition requires surgery. The veterinarian opens the cow's side with a 30 cm cut, manually twists the stomach back to the correct position and sews it onto to the abdomen wall. The whole procedure doesn't take much more than an hour and is performed right in the barn, definitely not under sterile conditions. But the animals always seem to come out okay.

The cow barn is not air conditioned and in the summer it gets pretty warm in the building. At night the cows are taken across the property to a night pasture where they are allowed to graze the whole night and they are taken back into the barn by 6 am. Year round the cows are fed "corn silage" which is made of ground up corn plants, stalks and all. The entire milk production is a big revenue producer for the Museum and offsets some of the operating costs.

From the Dairy Barn we went into an exhibition area that featured a variety of samples of historic farm machinery. The "Beck Circus", dating back to 1912, was a piece of demonstration equipment that was used to show how electricity could make a farmer's life easier. The Hydro-Electric Power Commission came up with this contraption to show farmers the operation of a variety of electrically powered devices, e.g. vacuum pumps for milking machines, a rocker churn to make butter, a feed grinder, a windmill pump and an electrical washing machine. These were the early days of electrical power when most farm work was still done completely manually, only assisted with the help of farm animals. It's hard to imagine how the quality of life of farmers must have improved with the advent of electric power.

David took me to an exhibition of farm tractors: originally they were large, powerful yet very dangerous machines. Through various technical innovations they were still large and even more powerful, but they became much safer to operate since working parts were no longer exposed. The Canada Agriculture Museum features a variety of tractors. One of the exhibits is hands-on; you can actually climb up into a tractor's seat, flick the switch and experience the bumpy, bone-jarring uncomfortable ride of an old-style tractor with metal wheels. Then you change the setting and you see the difference of how much smoother the ride is with rubber wheels. Another innovation that we don't even think about today that made life so much easier for farmers.

Another tractor was actually a hybrid vehicle from the 1930s, consisting of a car chassis and motor carriage that was converted into a farm tractor. Apparently the vehicle was neither particularly adept at being a passenger vehicle nor at being a tractor. The next big innovation on display was the "Cockshutt Tractor", built in Brantford, Ontario, which could have a manure spreader or other implement behind that was powered by the tractor's engine without the necessity for the tractor to be moving. This technology was called the "independent power takeoff" and a significant Canadian innovation during the 1940s.

The next piece of equipment was a specialized tractor used in vegetable fields which had a very slender nose and an engine mounted in the rear of the vehicle. The slender frontal portion would allow the farmer to see the vegetable planting much better. One of the popular displays at the Canada Agriculture Museum is a tractor simulator donated by the John Deere Company. You can climb up into the cab, look ahead through the windshield onto a simulated farmer's field and the simulator rocks you around in the cab as if you were in a real tractor ploughing the field. David explained that today's tractors actually have sophisticated GPS (global positioning systems) which keep track of which areas the farmer has already covered during planting so they don't go over the same area twice or miss other spots.

The machinery exhibit area includes a variety of quizzes with questions such as what would be the link to agriculture of a variety of everyday items. Diapers, photo film and other products we commonly use actually contain agricultural by-products, and we don't even associate them at all with farming operations. It's amazing how many items we take for granted in our daily lives and how many of them are derived from agricultural products.

Then David took me into the Small Animal Barn which houses the pigs, chickens, rabbits, sheep and goats of the Museum. Currently the Museum has one ram and 17 ewes that all have one to three lambs per year. Apparently pigs are surprisingly clean animals, they have a special designated area in their pens for bodily functions and they keep their living area totally clean. David showed me the birth area for the pigs which is called a "farrowing crate". It is a metal contraption that ensures that the mother pig doesn't squash the new born piglets, a very real danger with these sizeable animals.

On the way to the barn he explained that although the Canada Agriculture Museum is a great place for animals, they are still working on improving the facilities for the human visitors. One of the recent improvements is a big playground for children which will make the Canada Agriculture Museum an even more popular destination for young families.

Throughout the year, the Canada Agriculture Museum offers a comprehensive calendar of activities. I found out that the Museum is open 364 days a year with the exception of Christmas Day. All the facilities are fully accessible from March to October and during the winter months admission actually is free.

Some highlights of the calendar include activities during Easter where you can see rabbits, newborn lambs and newly-hatched chicks, not to forget the Easter egg hunt. Mother's Day (with free admission for all mothers) centers on "farm mothers", female animals that provide us with milk, eggs and meat. I of course already caught the Sheep Shearing Festival on the Victoria Day Weekend.

Special activities continue with Father's Day where all fathers get free admission so they can enjoy the Tractors exhibition. Canada Day activities focus on the Canadian Horse while there are fun and informative demonstrations all throughout the summer months. Fall welcomes visitors with October Harvest Weekends and special Halloween events and from November 1 to February 28 admission to the museum is free altogether. In addition to regular visitor programs, there are a variety of School Programs that encourage teachers to bring children to the Canada Agriculture Museum to learn and experience a working farm in the middle of the city.

On our way out of the Museum David mentioned that the Museum will have a brand new exhibition starting in March of 2007 called "Food for Health" which will deal with making wise food choices, food handling and various other nutrition-related topics. So that just means that next time I come to Ottawa I'll have something new to discover...

 

Hello From Ottawa: My Packed Itinerary For My 2-day Getaway To Canada's Capital

For a while my friend Theresa and I had been planning to go back to Ottawa and experience "Winterlude", Ottawa's winter festival. About three years ago we went to Ottawa, only to be rained out . Our main activity had fallen through: skating on the Rideau Canal, and even the ice sculptures had melted.

But that didn't deter us. So this past Friday we got in the car and after a pleasant 4.5 hour drive we arrived in Ottawa. After documenting my first impressions, we checked in...

Ottawa. Ontario, Canada, Winter, winterlude, Rideau Canal, skate

For a while my friend Theresa and I had been planning to go back to Ottawa and experience "Winterlude", Ottawa's winter festival. About three years ago we went to Ottawa, only to be rained out . Our main activity had fallen through: skating on the Rideau Canal, and even the ice sculptures had melted.

But that didn't deter us. So this past Friday we got in the car and after a pleasant 4.5 hour drive we arrived in Ottawa. After documenting my first impressions, we checked into the Lord Elgin Hotel, a historic landmark right in the heart of Ottawa.

Friday evening we explored one of Ottawa's main entertainment areas: the ByWard Market and we had a fabulous dinner at Fat Tuesdays, complete with live music and delicious Cajun food.

Saturday morning I got up early and explored the local area and took many photos in and around Parliament Hill. Then we got ready to explore one of Ottawa's main winter attractions: the Rideau Canal Skateway, the world's longest natural ice skating surface. The day was absolutely perfect and we were gliding effortlessly down the ice to our next destination: the 26th Annual Bedzz Races on Dow's Lake.

The bed race is a fabulous charity event and it's lots of fun for the audience, the participants and the organizers alike. Then I had to race off and see what else was going on at Confederation Park, one of the main Winterlude sites.

After a day full of physical exercise we discovered a historic local pub: Darcy McGee's on Sparks Street, Ottawa's pedestrian mall, and I had a chance to see how a perfect Guiness is poured, including the obligatory foam shamrock.

On Sunday morning I went to the Canadian War Museum, a fabulous new multi-media museum by the banks of the Ottawa River, and I also had a chance to visit a special exhibition called "Weapons of Mass Dissemination - the Propaganda of War". I wished I had had more time to spend here.

My next and final stop in Ottawa was a visit to the Canadian Museum of Contemporary Photography, a unique museum housed in a former railroad tunnel. There I focussed on an exhibition by Sunil Gupta, who was born in India and moved to Montreal at age 15. Gupta explores issues of personal, sexual and cultural identity, and his highly personal images left a deep impact.

This time I didn't have time for some of Ottawa's other main attractions, such as the National Gallery or the Canadian Museum of Civilization, but I am certainly hoping to catch those next time when I go to Ottawa, maybe even this coming May, for Ottawa's famous Tulip Festival.

 

Hello From Ottawa - Ottawa's Byward Market And The Mardi Gras Experience At Fat Tuesdays

After our arrival in Ottawa this afternoon and a very brief rest at our hotel, we went out in search of a satisfying dinner. The Lord Elgin Hotel is just about 15 minutes walk away from the Historic ByWard Market area, which is one of Ottawa's main entertainment areas.

Winterlude is a great time because during this winter festival, many of Ottawa's restaurants offer entertainment and special events. Our destination was Fat Tuesday's, a New Orleans-style restaurant that is ...

Ottawa. Ontario, Canada, Winter, winterlude, Rideau Canal, skate, cousine

After our arrival in Ottawa this afternoon and a very brief rest at our hotel, we went out in search of a satisfying dinner. The Lord Elgin Hotel is just about 15 minutes walk away from the Historic ByWard Market area, which is one of Ottawa's main entertainment areas.

Winterlude is a great time because during this winter festival, many of Ottawa's restaurants offer entertainment and special events. Our destination was Fat Tuesday's, a New Orleans-style restaurant that is known for its Cajun Creole cuisine and its contemporary dishes.

After we refreshed ourselves and got organized, we headed off at about 6:45 and started our walk toward the ByWard Market, Ottawa’s prime entertainment area. We crossed the Laurier Bridge, which is the setting of quite a few of my husband’s anecdotes about Ottawa’s winter cold which he got to experience in full force during his time at the University of Ottawa in the early 1980s.

We too noticed that there was a stiff fresh breeze coming off the Rideau Canal and by pure coincidence we did a smart thing: we headed into the Rideau Centre, Ottawa’s largest shopping centre. For about 15 minutes we got to walk inside past all the retail stores, totally sheltered from the biting wintery wind.

Well, it didn’t take us long at all to get to the heart of the ByWard Market, and a friendly guy at a Beavertail sales booth (Beavertails are Ottawa’s famous trademark pastry) gave us directions to Fat Tuesday’s, home of Ottawa’s Mardi Gras experience.

Once inside this stylish yet cozy bar/restaurant we had a chance to get a lay of the land from Manny Garcia who’s the general manager and one of the co-owners. He told us that Fat Tuesday’s was created about 4 years ago and is an independently owned restaurant (not part of any restaurant chain). Fat Tuesday's combines an upscale Cajun/Creole kitchen with live entertainment and great friendly service, and it’s a place where people of all ages congregate.

When we were there the place was packed and the waitresses were dressed up in bustiers and some were wearing face masks in keeping with the Mardi Gras theme. The staff seemed to have a lot of fun and they enjoyed interacting with the customers.

Our appetite had been building up appropriately and for me, the escargots in a garlic-white wine sauce were just the thing to warm up the palate. After this tasty appetizer I followed up with a Mediterranean salad of baby greens with goat cheese and a citrus vinaigrette. Manny came over and persuaded us to try the Pacific rim seared tuna with a pepper crust in a sweet teriyaki sauce, accompanied by shaved ginger and a wasabi mayonnaise. A delicate and tasty treat.

We even had a chance to meet the chef himself. Executive chef Neil Baker told us about himself and we found out that we had a true cosmopolitan world traveler in front of us.

As the child of diplomatic parents, Neil was born in Singapore and has also lived in Barbados, Kenya and Thailand. He’s run restaurants in Toronto, Vancouver, Los Angeles, New York City and now Ottawa. Needless to say, Neil is going to be my next contact for an interview about this international lifestyle.

Neil also made a couple of interesting comments about global cuisine. He mentioned that the same culinary themes reappear across the globe. Chinese fried rice is essentially the same as Jambalaya which is essentially the same as Biryani, with a slightly different mix of spices thrown in. And the world's most popular cuisines are those based on the dishes of poor people.

Neil insisted that we have dessert and we had Bananas Foster, which is a mouthwatering concoction of flambéed bananas with caramelized sugar and rum and some vanilla icecream thrown in with a twist of cinnamon on top. I was going to stay away from dessert, but Bananas Foster totally corrupted me. I wasn't going to worry about the extra calories since we are going to go skating on the Rideau Canal tomorrow anyways.

At 10:30 every Friday and Saturday night Fat Tuesdays serves up the dueling pianos, a live show where the audience can request their favourite songs from two piano players. Today unfortunately the second piano player was significantly delayed, and given our packed schedule for Saturday, we were unable to stick around for the second piano player to show up. But virtuoso no. 1 played his heart out and really got the crowd going. The place was packed and everybody was in a great mood.

So, it’s just past midnight now and I am looking forward to another action-packed day tomorrow: some skating on the Rideau Canal (to work off that delicious banana dessert), watching the famous Bedzzz Races on Dow’s Lake and then the Fire and Ice Culinary demonstrations at Confederation Park right across from our hotel.

It is definitely time to get some rest for a big day and hit the hay……




glasgow dundee tourist information
goals for vacation
go camping in virginia beach
golf courses club driving ranges
golf holidays hitting library
golf holiday travel insurance
golf in orlando country club
golf real estate travel package
golf resort cheap hotels
good quality travel luggage
gossip for tourists sapporo japan
gran canaria puerto banus tourist guide
grand cayman snorkeling
grand cayman vacation rentals
great barrier reef vacation
great vacation travel destination
greece health spa city skopelos island
greek holiday vacation attractions
group travel discounts available online
guanajuato false expectations unexplained mysteries
guanajuato heritage land of frogs
guanajuato living buy house
guggenheim spruce goose arabia steamboat museum
guided tours luxury travel vacation packages
guinate tropical park lanzarote holiday villas
golf coast natural flatlands lake constance
haliburton highlands fishing in canada
halifax city tour garrison house restaurant
hawaii all inclusive vacation packages
hawaiian beach rentals
hawaii big island vacations
hawaii cruise honeymoon vacation package
hawaii luxury beach villas
hawaii vacation accommodation holiday homes
hawaii vacation packages spa resorts
hawaii vacation rental
hawaii vacation rental features reservation
hawaii vacation rental home fascinating volcanoes
hawaii vacation rentals
hawaii vacation resort
hawaii volcano helicopter tour
heart of cayman islands journey
hedonism vacation lodgings house exchange
heels foot health venetian
hello from austria
hello from banff
hello from canadian rockies
hello from chicago discovering hotels
hello from cuba bureaucracy galore
hello from curnavaca
hello from mexico city
hello from montreal
hello from montreal charming unique city
hello from new york city
hello from nova scotia
hello from nova scotia history
hello from nova scotia victorian heritage
hello from orlando
hello from orlando art of culture
hello from ottawa canadian agriculture museum
accommodations family ski hawaii vacation
austrian alps country drive how determination
booking your vacation
cheap airline ticket to philippines
cruise job tips trip to asia
fayetteville travel observer newspaper
hemingways hotel richmond
kauai vacation sights activities
luxury maui vacation book reservations online
mount snow romantic tennessee ski vacations