Home Articles Blog Updates Subjects Topics Tips & Guides New Contact Us
adblock creatives to be added later Loose weight without medicines, step by step

Improve your sex life -- overcome your frustration

Survive in Bed Click Here!

Increase your breast size by 2 cups, naturally and without surgery Click Here!
This Single Mother Makes Over $700 per Week Helping Businesses With Their Facebook and Twitter Accounts. You too can earn extra money. Click Here!

Earn money with simple online job works. Click Here!

Discounts at Amazon.com

Eliminate your diabetes, we can help you destroy your diabetes

Self improvement and motivational guru gives simple tips to success - must listen

A foolproof, science based diet that will reduce your weight by 12 to 23 pound Click Here!

Blog

Holiday, Vacation & Tour

 

A Taste Of Huddersfield History

Huddersfield sits at the confluence of the rivers Colne and Holme, whose waters and valleys have drawn people to the area for thousands of years. In common with much of Northern England it has been inhabited or settled at one time or another by Mesolithic, Neolithic and Bronze Age man, Ancient Britons, Romans, Angles, Jutes and Saxons as well as by conquering Norsemen and Normans.

Set out in any direction from the town centre and you can be sure that you will be treading o...

huddersfield,huddersfield history

Huddersfield sits at the confluence of the rivers Colne and Holme, whose waters and valleys have drawn people to the area for thousands of years. In common with much of Northern England it has been inhabited or settled at one time or another by Mesolithic, Neolithic and Bronze Age man, Ancient Britons, Romans, Angles, Jutes and Saxons as well as by conquering Norsemen and Normans.

Set out in any direction from the town centre and you can be sure that you will be treading on ground traversed by our earliest forbears, Roman Legions, Pictish raiders, Viking invaders, and Saxon kings – there was once a Saxon court at Almondbury.

Castle Hill near Huddersfield together with its Victoria Tower is unquestionably the town’s most recognizable landmark. The castle in question was the one built on the hill near Almondbury in the reign of King Stephen (1135-1154) but demolished two centuries later. Construction work on Victoria Tower, built to commemorate the 60th year of the reign of Queen Victoria, was completed in 1899 (in the 62nd year of her reign). However, these facts are not what makes Castle Hill so valuable.

The true importance of Castle Hill is found in the remains of its 2,500 year old, Iron Age hill fort, itself probably built on even earlier settlements, and it is this rather than the more conspicuous 19th century addition that lends the site its status as Scheduled Ancient Monument as well as its true historic value.

Although Huddersfield and its surrounding area is thought to have been continuously settled for at least the last 4,000 years, the expansion and prosperity of the town is owed principally to its proto-industrial and industrial past. Huddersfield was above all a Georgian and Victorian construct and this legacy is visible wherever you go, evidenced by canals, converted textile mills, Victorian shopping arcades and the fine architecture of St George’s Square and beyond.

Before the arrival of the industrialists however, the district of Huddersfield was variously a patchwork of linked settlements, a baronial manor ruled over by the King’s Tenant-in-Chief, a centre for the wool trade and a market town by Royal Charter. When the machine age was born, the area became a focus for the Luddite rebellion spreading up from Nottinghamshire and became infamous through the murder of a local manufacturer.

 

Huddersfield - A Concise Tourist Guide

The town of Huddersfield lies among hills, moorland and 300 million year old river valleys carved out by ancient tropical river deltas and glaciers. The steep green uplands skirting it to the South continue further on to become the Peak District while the coal rich land to the East tilts gently away towards the sea. Much of the land around Huddersfield rises to between 200 and 400m above mean sea level and the hills around the Holme Valley to the South and West of Huddersfiel...

huddersfield,huddersfield tourist guide,huddersfield history,huddersfield architecture

The town of Huddersfield lies among hills, moorland and 300 million year old river valleys carved out by ancient tropical river deltas and glaciers. The steep green uplands skirting it to the South continue further on to become the Peak District while the coal rich land to the East tilts gently away towards the sea. Much of the land around Huddersfield rises to between 200 and 400m above mean sea level and the hills around the Holme Valley to the South and West of Huddersfield are among the prettiest to be seen in England.

Huddersfield is situated equidistantly between the cities of Manchester to the West, Leeds to the North and Sheffield to the South and is easily accessible from the M62 or the M1 motorways making it a great strategic stopover. However, the town and surrounding area has much to recommend it and is well worth a few days exploration.

History
Huddersfield gets a mention in the Doomsday book (Oderesfelt). Before the Norman invasion it was a small Saxon market town and the area is thought to have been continuously settled for at least 4,000 years. One place to view the full story of Huddersfield’s evolution from the Neolithic to the modern past is at the Tolson Museum just outside the town centre.

At Almondbury, a mile to the South East of the town are situated the remains of one of England’s most important Iron Age settlements, sharing a hill with the town’s most recognisable landmark, the Victoria Tower at Castle Hill - built to mark the late queen’s 60th year of ascendancy. The hill is an important historical focus for Huddersfield. The Saxons had a royal court in Almondbury and in the reign of King Stephen a castle was built there (hence Castle Hill) but this was demolished in the 14th century. The hill has the status of Scheduled Ancient Monument and from its summit can be gained fine views of the surrounding countryside.

Architecture
Huddersfield is famous for both the number and quality of its listed buildings and has some truly outstanding examples of Georgian and Victorian architecture. Its railway façade has been described by architectural historian Nicolas Pevsner as ‘the best neoclassical station façade in Europe’. At Horbury, some 9 miles outside Huddersfield lies the 18th century church of St Peter and St Leonard – recognised as being the finest Georgian church in West Yorkshire.

Even some of the town’s more modern and controversial buildings have their fans: Adrian Evans, Architect and lecturer at Leeds Metropolitan University believes the modern Market Hall, built in the late 1960’s, to be at least as significant architecturally as the station. Be warned though, others have called it plain, shabby and unexciting.

Industrial Heritage
The industrial revolution initiated Huddersfield’s transformation into a textile powerhouse, and that Georgian and Victorian legacy is still very evident today in the buildings, canals and old workings that make the town such a valuable historical resource. The Colne Valley Museum in Golcar, just outside Huddersfield is worth a visit to get a flavour of what life was like in the early Victorian, industrial heartlands of Northern Britain.

One industrial heritage must-see during your stay in Huddersfield is the 18/19th century Standedge canal tunnel near Marsden, some 7 miles outside the town centre. This tunnel, completed by Thomas Telford in 1811, is the highest (645 feet above sea level), deepest (638 feet under the surface) and longest (three and a quarter miles) canal tunnel in the country. It took 16 years to build, claiming many lives in the process. There is a full visitor centre there and from April to October you can experience the tunnel for yourself in a glass topped boat. The tunnel was reopened in 2001 after 50 years of neglect.

At Overton, some 7 miles outside Huddersfield, you can visit the National Coal Mining Museum, built around the former Caphouse Colliery which closed in 1985 and was superbly restored with heritage funding. There you can descend 450 feet into a real mine or discover the restored mining buildings, and the museum proper. The National Coal Mining museum will give you a real insight into Britain’s recent industrial heritage and the working lives of those who mined for coal here.

The Holme Valley
Some 6 miles South of the centre lies Holmfirth, the picturesque heart of the Holme Valley and stunning backdrop to the much loved television series ‘Last of the Summer Wine’. The BBC still films the series around the town and tour buses running out of Holmfirth can take you on an intimate journey around some of the best known locations from the series.

From Holmfirth and surrounding villages you can walk out onto the Moors or traverse the many trails that criss cross the area. Huddersfield is a veritable Mecca for walkers.

Country Parks and Houses
For those who prefer the relaxation offered by country parks and houses, the area around Huddersfield has an abundance. Try the 16th century Oakwell Hall and its 100 acre country park at Birstall, some 8 miles outside the town and a favourite haunt of Charlotte Bronte; or Longley Old Hall near the town centre, an architectural treasure trove of 14th century origins and later Elizabethan addtions.

How about another of Charlotte Bronte’s favourite places – the Red House at Gomersal, some 7 miles from Huddersfield; or the ancient Shibden Hall and its 90 acre park near Halifax built in the early 15th century and featuring rooms furnished from the 17th to 19th centuries. Other places guaranteed to excite you are the Georgian Cannon Hall & Country Park at Cawthorne featuring fantastic 18th century walled gardens, a museum and a wonderful farm where you are free to feed the many animals; and the Yorkshire Sculpture Park and visitor centre in West Bretton with 500 acres of lush parkland featuring figures by Henry Moore, Anthony Gormley and others.

Nights Out
For nights out in Huddersfield, how about the modern Lawrence Batley Theatre in Queens Square or the Cragrats Theatre in Holmfirth. Near the home of Huddersfield football and rugby teams, the Galpharm Stadium, you can find a multiplex cinema and ten pin bowling alley.

If clubbing is your scene then check out the many great clubs in Huddersfield including the Camel Club, Tokyo, Livingstones and Billie Rox.

Dining Out
There are many places to go for a fine dining experience in Huddersfield and the surrounding area. Try the contemporary Vanilla V1 Restaurant in Lindley or the CragRats Brasserie in Holmfirth. Book in advance for a treat at the Three Acres at Roydhouse near Shelley or try the wonderful Olive Branch in Marsden. How about the award winning Weavers Shed in Golcar? For great Yorkshire food you might also visit the Woodman Inn at Thunderbridge. However, don’t stop there, in Huddersfield town there are many other restaurants and bars to choose from. Those mentioned are just some of the best.

Whatever you decide to do in Huddersfield you’ll be glad you came.

 

Canterbury: Home Of The Canterbury Tales And Much More

Canterbury is a cathedral city located in east Kent in South East England, founded as the Romano-Celtic town of Durovernum Cantiacorum. Canterbury is the seat of the Archbishop of Canterbury, the Primate of All England, head of the Church of England and of the worldwide Anglican Communion. It has also become a major tourist centre in South East England, lined with ancient buildings interspersed with modern building development. The city is also well-known as the backdrop of G...

canterbury, canterbury tales, canterbury hotels

Canterbury is a cathedral city located in east Kent in South East England, founded as the Romano-Celtic town of Durovernum Cantiacorum. Canterbury is the seat of the Archbishop of Canterbury, the Primate of All England, head of the Church of England and of the worldwide Anglican Communion. It has also become a major tourist centre in South East England, lined with ancient buildings interspersed with modern building development. The city is also well-known as the backdrop of Geoffrey Chaucer's Canterbury Tales (1387).

Canterbury has a total population of about 42,258.

Canterbury West and Canterbury East are the two main railway stations, with services operated by Southeastern. Canterbury West is mainly served from London Charing Cross and trains to Ramsgate and Margate, while services from London Victoria stop at Canterbury East and continue to Dover. Bus services operate to most destinations in east Kent, and terminate at the main bus station at the end of the high street. Stagecoach Coaches is the main provider of bus travel. By road, Canterbury is by-passed by the A2 London to Dover Road, and the A28 from Ashford to Ramsgate and Margate.

A wide variety of restaurants and cafes, from low to mid range, serving different style of cuisine, can be found at Downtown Canterbury. The city is also well-known for its fine selection of pubs, offering several chain pubs, such as JD Wetherspoons, and numerous other late night venues. As for shopping, the Whitefriars development project has brought many new outlets into Canterbury, transforming it into a major shopping destination featuring designer shops such as GAP, Tescos, Top Man, Next etc.

The main tourist attractions in Canterbury include Canterbury Cathedral, which is famous as the scene of the murder of Thomas à Becket, and is the seat of the Archbishop of Canterbury; St Martin's Church, oldest parish church in England; Canterbury Castle, ruins of a Norman castle built in the 11th Century; Canterbury Tales Visitor Attraction, a stunning reconstruction of 14th century England inside the historic building of St Margaret’s Church based on the tales and characters of Chaucer's Canterbury Tales; West Gate Tower, a small collection of material about the tower and the history of Canterbury; Canterbury Royal Museum and Art Gallery, a splendid Victorian building housing decorative arts and picture collections; Canterbury Roman Museum; Canterbury Environment Centre; and Greyfriars House Chapel and the Franciscan Gardens.

Canterbury has plenty of places to stay from small guest houses through to large hotels. You can find a wide selection ofplaces to stay in Canterbury at the 4Hotels.co.uk web site.

Canterbury is also host to some very popular festivals and events such as Canterbury Festival, featuring classical music concerts, drama and theatre performances, opera, art exhibitions, dance, jazz, folk and blues music, street entertainment, fireworks, children's events, walks, talks and films; Canterbury Euro Fair, a celebration of the flavours, sights and sounds of Europe in a three-day feast of food, drink, art, crafts and culture; St Nicholas Parade, an event in the City Centre to celebrate the true Father Christmas and Santa Claus; and Herne Bay Festival, a summertime festival family fun.




hello from sicily in cefalu
hello from sicily in milazzo
hello from sicily twin mountains
hello from toronto discovring casa loma
hello from toronto festival and afrofest
hello from toronto niagara wine country
helping people enjoy luxury vacations
hemingways hotel richmond
henna tattoos personality of kathmandu
hike through raabklamm visit to graz
hiking vacations guidelines
historical spanish holiday spain
historical spanish holiday spain real estate
historic atlanta aquarium
historic auberge mcgee sheep shearing festival
history of chesterfield
holiday apartments rental money maker
holiday in maremma israel hotels
holiday in munich and bavaria
holiday prepartions made easy
holidays travel with family
holiday to tenerife art of haggling
holiday travel insurance
holiday trip travel by car
holidayws at sea
home exchange vacation academy ebook
home sweet cabin mountain cabin vacations
honeymoon cabins ideas designing honeymoon suite
honeymoon getaways ideas
honeymoon getaway weekend city break
honeymoon in kenya tortilis camp amboseli
honeymoon money saving tips budget
honeymoon nights resorts safaris
honeymoon vacation resort
hong kong hotels tourist destinations
hotel bruges belgium pablo chufeni
hotel shopping tips italy by bike
hotels in alicante torrevieja
hotels in malaga spain
hotel spas taveuni resort amankora lodges
hot summer ponte vecchio in florence
how to elope limousine hiring
how to travel responsibly
huddersfield history canterbury tales
hurricanes strike cruise lines
iceland vacation plate diving
improve group travel experience tips
independent travel disney world florida
indian ocean lodge maia luxury resort
inexpensive honeymoon vacations lingerie luxury hotels
information online about fayetteville
inner tourist destination tourist setting sail
intellectual adventurer travel
international honeymoon holiday destinations
international travel accessory guide deals
international travel medical insurance
internet coupons travel savings tips
island of women laidback luxury
island vacation at florida
jamaica's all inclusive resorts
travel tour preparedness
touring wine country winemaking secrets caves
spanish attraction charm fiestas
saving money on gasoline
visiting diving surfing in cornwall
prepare holiday checklists
planning for holidays
mountain biking hiking travel tips
luxury in london vacation guide
kauai snorkeling diving adventuresvvvvvvvvv